anaerobic digestion

(redirected from Anaerobic decomposition)

anaerobic digestion

n
the conversion of biodegradable waste matter into compost in the absence of oxygen
anaerobic digester n
References in periodicals archive ?
The highest emissions came from the tropics, especially the Amazon region, where the bottom waters and sediments tend to be oxygen-free, leading to anaerobic decomposition that contributes significantly to methane production.
Anaerobic decomposition of other waste and their mixtures has lower volume of biogas FMW--17%, FVW--22%, FW 29% VMW--34% in VW--41%.
I am continually surprised how many people don't understand the basic rotting process, the difference between aerobic and anaerobic decomposition.
Because the bags are breathable, anaerobic decomposition is limited and there is no smell.
Of course, the resulting peat material that comes from the anaerobic decomposition of sphagnum moss in peat bogs not only provides us with a perfect medium for growing our beloved plants in but it also provides the world with a source of heat, releasing vast quantities of stored CO as it burns - I wonder whether the absorption and release of CO equal one another and therefore make peat a carbon neutral resource?
Aerobic composting does emit odors, but they are not perceived as offensive as the malodors produced during anaerobic decomposition.
Anaerobic decomposition generates methane, a greenhouse gas that is 20 times more potent than [CO.
Total anaerobic decomposition of the glucose as a product of the cellulose at usage of 100% substrate is possible describe by following formula:
Before delayed rice transplantation was performed, wheat straw underwent anaerobic decomposition for 24 days, which provided considerable substrates and optimal conditions for C[H.
They modify their environment by processing and aerating the waste, thereby preventing the decay process from turning 'bad' - anaerobic decomposition.
Methane is formed by anaerobic decomposition, primarily in swamps, but also in trash heaps--the byproduct of billions of bacteria digesting organic matter like leather shoes, paper cups, and chicken bones.
Their work also revealed the presence, in the bottom waters, of minor amounts of ammonia and sulfide--both chemicals associated with the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter.