analytic philosophy

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Related to Analytic philosopher: Analytic tradition, Ordinary language movement

analytic philosophy

n.
1. Any of various philosophical methodologies holding that clear and precise definition and argumentation are vital to productive philosophical inquiry.
2. A philosophical school of the 20th century predominant in the United States and Great Britain whose central concerns are the nature of logic, concepts, and language. Leading practitioners have included Bertrand Russell, George Edward Moore, Rudolf Carnap, and Ludwig Wittgenstein.
References in periodicals archive ?
The contemporary analytic philosopher of whatever ilk does not communicate personal feelings or intuitions; he analyzes or 'deconstructs' language.
Robert Brandom is an analytic philosopher, but while following in its rationalist tradition, he argues for a revisionary perspective, holding that we obtain meaning through inference rather than reference to a state of affairs.
The last chapter is primarily dedicated to refuting analytic philosopher Michael Smith's version of Humeanism.
Such thought experiments are arguably the most important tools in the kit of the analytic philosopher, but they barely exist in classical Indian Buddhist literature.
Furthermore, like sociolinguists, I contend that the analytic philosopher is not a neutral party, who stands apart from the concept being analyzed.
The analytic philosopher Hilary Putnam, Cogan University Professor, Emeritus, at Harvard University, has in his retirement produced a slim and unpretentious volume of four studies devoted to modern Jewish thought, As described in an autobiographical introduction, Putnam developed a personal interest in his Jewishness late in life.
Both Conger and Castell published a fair amount-the library of my university (5) has six books written or edited by Conger and five written or edited by Castell--and it is clear that neither man was an analytic philosopher.
Part of the phenomenology and pathological mindset of an analytic philosopher is that he/she will studiously avoid reading this book or any other work overtly critical of analytic philosophy.
This is unfortunate because there is no reason in principle why there could not be an Aristotelian personalist, or an analytic philosopher who was a personalist, and not through the mere addition of phenomenological techniques to some other philosophical basis.
Thus, let me turn to the work of an analytic philosopher, William Alston.
An analytic philosopher by training, Rorty has won a large audience in the humanities in part by maintaining that excellent scientists and philosophers are not truth seekers in any special sense but are best regarded as Bloomian strong poets.
If one is an analytic philosopher and one has a powerful argument, what difference does it make whether one came upon it from reading Kant or from reading a comic book?