Anancy

Anancy

(əˈnænsɪ) or

Anansi

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a character in Caribbean folklore, a cunning trickster generally depicted as a spider with a human head; the subject of many Anancy stories, the character has its origins among the Ashanti of W Africa
References in periodicals archive ?
In so doing, he is obliquely drawing out the ways that marronage instigates a reconnection to diasporic African cultural elements like Yoruban deities (vodou) and mischievous Anancy stories (oral storytelling).
Yeats, "The Yes Yes Second Coming" Joseph Conrad Heart of Darkness Wole Soyinka Death and the King's Death and the King's Horseman Horseman Birago Diop "The Bone"; "Mother Omitted; orature Crocodile" represented by one-page Ghanian Anancy tale Bernard Dadie "The Mirror of Omitted; orature Dearth"; "The Black represented by one-page Cloth"; "The Hunter Ghanian Anancy tale and the Boa" Leopold Senghor 9 Poems 8 Poems Doris Lessing "The Old Chief "The Old Chief Mshlanga" Mshlanga"
In a significant act of re-memory, the adult persona in The Water Between Us re-assembles the Jamaican Anancy stories and the European fairytales she grew up with, to create a poetic narrative of selfishness and greed that causes those with power to violate the rights of others.
designed 18-hole golf course, Half Moon Golf Academy, Spinning[R] studio, 13 lit tennis courts, equestrian centre, fitness centre, 54 swimming pools, a teen activity centre, the colorful Anancy Children's Village, water sports, dolphin lagoon, shopping village, including 24-hour medical centre and more.
Anansi came to be called Anancy, and the hare became Brer (Brother) Rabbit, the character who appears in the Uncle Remus animal fables that were collected by Joel Chandler Harris in the late 1800s.
6) Like Anancy (which is the dominant trickster character amongst the Ashanti in Ghana as well as in the Caribbean), whether B' Rabby is pitted against the likes of Brer Bear, Brer Wolf, or Sly Brer Fox (in Black American narratives) or the powerful B' Lion and B' Whale or the dimwitted B' Boukee (his favorite adversaries in Bahamian orature), he "tries to nullify the plans of his [sometimes] stronger archenemies by using his superior intelligence and his quick thinking" (46).
One popular tradition, which has its origins in the folklore of the Ashanti people of Ghana, is the story of Anancy, a mythical talking spider who because of his guile, wit, and cunning always manages to get the upper hand in any situation.
Anancy the trickster spider figured in these stories, as did ghosts and rolling calves, rum, molasses and sugar.
Hopkinson identifies three core folk stories in the construction of Midnight Robber: the African trickster tale of Anancy the Spider and Dry Bone, the Taino ecological myth of the squalid planet, and the Jamaican legend of Three-[F]ingered Jack, a historical figure who killed his plantation owner for a crime committed against his mother and then became the subject of fear rather than celebration amongst the people of the island.
play time Pupils of Longroyde Junior School and Fixby Junior and Infant School, who presented the play Anancy and the 13 Plantains AFRICAN Caribbean groups in Huddersfield joined forces to celebrate Black History Month.