anarchism

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Related to Anarchist movement: anarchy

an·ar·chism

 (ăn′ər-kĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory or doctrine that all forms of government are oppressive and undesirable and should be abolished.
2. Active resistance and terrorism against the state, as used by some anarchists.
3. Rejection of all forms of coercive control and authority: "He was inclined to anarchism; he hated system and organization and uniformity" (Bertrand Russell).

an′ar·chist (-kĭst) n.
an′ar·chis′tic (-kĭs′tĭk) adj.

anarchism

(ˈænəˌkɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) political theory a doctrine advocating the abolition of government
2. the principles or practice of anarchists

an•ar•chism

(ˈæn ərˌkɪz əm)

n.
1. a doctrine urging the abolition of government or governmental restraint as the indispensable condition for full social and political liberty.
2. the methods or practices of anarchists.
[1635–45]

anarchism

1. a political theory advocating the elimination of governments and governmental restraint and the substitution of voluntary cooperation among individuals.
2. the methods and practices of anarchists. Cf. Nihilism.anarchist, n.anarchic, adj.
See also: Government

anarchism

The political theory that all governments oppress the people and should be abolished.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anarchism - a political theory favoring the abolition of governmentsanarchism - a political theory favoring the abolition of governments
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations
فَوْضَوِيه
anarchismus
anarkisme
anarchizmus
stjórnleysi
anarchizmus
anarşizm

anarchism

[ˈænəkɪzəm] Nanarquismo m

anarchism

[ˈænərkɪzəm] nanarchisme m

anarchism

nAnarchismus m

anarchism

[ˈænəˌkɪzm] n (Pol) → anarchismo

anarchy

(ˈӕnəki) noun
1. the absence or failure of government. Total anarchy followed the defeat of the government.
2. disorder and confusion.
ˈanarchist noun
1. a person who believes that governments are unnecessary or undesirable.
2. a person who tries to overturn the government by violence.
ˈanarchism noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Schaffer's contribution is similar, examining the largely indigenous Puerto Rican anarchist movement but situating the Puerto Rican movement within a much larger regional network that linked Puerto Rico to Havana, Tampa, New York, Philadelphia and beyond.
Therefore, Open Road pushed its colleagues in the North American anarchist movement to engage with punk, to channel and amplify its rebellion into an explicit revolutionary force.
The reports said he admitted having the anarchist cookbook and other documents in a folder titled 'Anarchism' but told the court: 'I am not associated with the anarchist movement but I know things about anarchist and left wing and about right wing.
These youth have even done their best to attract other youth to the group, an anarchist movement with criminal tendencies that does nothing but destruct private property, threaten lives and propagate the use of drugs, crime and homosexuality," he said.
Anarchist movement Black Bloc have warned that they will try to interrupt proceedings during the World Cup, and security is tight around the plush Costa do Sauipe resort where the draw is taking place on Friday.
Goldman was born in 1869 in Russia and emigrated to New York City in 1885, where she became wrapped up in the anarchist movement.
An interlude shifts the conversation to the Chinese anarchist movement in the 20th century.
As stated above, Staudenmaier's political experience has been in the revolutionary anarchist movement.
Daubed on trees in the central Syntagma square and scrawled on the leaves of plants beneath the Acropolis, the crudely spray-painted symbol of the anarchist movement, a black 'A' enclosed inside a circle, is omnipresent.
The black masks have become, unfairly or not, the face of the modern anarchist movement.
Investigators were quoted by Italian media as saying they were looking into possible links with the anarchist movement which is particularly strong in Genoa after recent calls by some anarchists for moves towards "armed action.
The anarchist movement was "brutally suppressed" after the Haymarket affair and did not "emerge again as a mass-movement" until the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) was organized in 1905 (McKean, 2006).