anata

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anata

(ˈænətə) or

anatman

n
(Buddhism) (in Theravada Buddhism) the belief that since all things are constantly changing, there can be no such thing as a permanent, unchanging self: one of the three basic characteristics of existence. Sanskrit word: anatman Compare anicca, dukkha
[Pali, literally: no self]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Un caso extremo de esta sospecha, de esta necesidad de replantear la verdad de la meta final, cuestionando incluso su supuesto caracter final, es el anatman budista, la ausencia de esencia.
Buddha] involves an apprehension of anatman (no-self).
For instance, the Buddha sometimes refers to atman (a personal self), which is contrary to his teaching of anatman (the doctrine that there is no personal self).
El alma, por definicion, es una nocion estatica y fija, inmutable y permanente, la cual se opone a la esencia del budismo cuyos rasgos definitorios de la existencia humana son el anatman (la ausencia de alma), la anitya (la transitoriedad, el cambio constante, que es comun a todo lo existente) y el dukkha (el sufrimiento).
Key to such spiritual development in the Buddhist traditions is the doctrine of anatman or non-essentiality.
Rather it preached that the ideal spiritual state is one of anatman, or selflessness.
The concept is definitively Mahayana in nature, he says, but the notion of some sort of essence to be recognized, coaxed, cultivated, or enlightened seems to be at odds with the early Buddhist concepts of anatman (no-self) and pratitya-samutpada (dependent co-arising).
The Buddhist Anatman presumption emphasizes the emptiness of anything personal.
What Hall and Ames say has some basis: Buddhists advance the doctrine of anatman, "no soul," maintaining that there is no ego or self.
Given that my intent was not to construct a survey of the full range of anatman throughout the history of Buddhism (in which case I certainly would have cited the curious case of the Pudgalavadin school, perhaps the only Buddhist school that unequivocally asserts the existence of a self), I believe that I have offered representative examples of how anatman has been understood in various periods in the history of Buddhist thought.
important of the links is ignorance (of the truth of anatman, no-self).
Of course there is nothing specifically Mahayana about the pan-Buddhist metaphysical idea of anatman.