Anderson


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Related to Anderson: James Anderson

Anderson

, Dame Judith 1898-1992.
Australian-born actress noted for her roles in the plays of Shakespeare and Eugene O'Neill and for her chilling portrayal of Mrs. Danvers in the 1940 film Rebecca.

Anderson

, Margaret Caroline 1886-1973.
American editor who founded and edited The Little Review (1914-1929), an influential literary magazine.

Anderson

, Marian 1897-1993.
American contralto. Acclaimed for her renditions of spirituals, she was the first African-American singer to perform at New York City's Metropolitan Opera (1955).

Anderson

, Sherwood 1876-1941.
American writer whose often autobiographical works include Winesburg, Ohio (1919).

Anderson

(ˈændəsən)
n
(Placename) a river in N Canada, in the Northwest Territories, rising in lakes north of Great Bear Lake and flowing west and north to the Beaufort Sea. Length: about 580 km (360 miles)

Anderson

(ˈændəsən)
n
1. (Biography) Carl David. 1905–91, US physicist, who discovered the positron in cosmic rays (1932): Nobel prize for physics 1936
2. (Biography) Elizabeth Garrett. 1836–1917, English physician and feminist: a campaigner for the admission of women to the professions
3. (Biography) John. 1893–1962, Australian philosopher, born in Scotland, whose theories are expounded in Studies in Empirical Philosophy (1962)
4. (Biography) Dame Judith, real name Frances Margaret Anderson. 1898–1992, Australian stage and film actress
5. (Biography) Lindsay (Gordon) 1923–94, British film and theatre director: his films include This Sporting Life (1963), If (1968), O Lucky Man! (1973), and The Whales of August (1987)
6. (Biography) Marian. 1902–93, US contralto, the first Black permanent member of the Metropolitan Opera Company, New York
7. (Biography) Philip Warren. born 1923, US physicist, noted for his work on solid-state physics. Nobel prize for physics 1977
8. (Biography) Sherwood. 1874–1941, US novelist and short-story writer, best known for Winesburg Ohio (1919), a collection of short stories illustrating small-town life

An•der•son

(ˈæn dər sən)

n.
1. Carl David, 1905–91, U.S. physicist: Nobel prize 1936.
2. Dame Judith, 1898–1992, Australian actress.
3. Marian, 1902–93, U.S. contralto.
4. Maxwell, 1888–1959, U.S. playwright.
5. Sherwood, 1876–1941, U.S. author.
6. a city in central Indiana. 60,720.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anderson - United States author whose works were frequently autobiographical (1876-1941)Anderson - United States author whose works were frequently autobiographical (1876-1941)
2.Anderson - United States physicist who studied the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems (1923-)
3.Anderson - United States dramatist (1888-1959)
4.Anderson - United States contralto noted for her performance of spirituals (1902-1993)
5.Anderson - United States physicist who discovered antimatter in the form of an antielectron that is called the positron (1905-1991)
Translations
Andersen
Andersen
Andersson
References in classic literature ?
Gardener had gone to Omaha to hear Booth and Barrett, who were to play there next week, and that Mary Anderson was having a great success in `A Winter's Tale,' in London.
The boatswain, Job Anderson, was the likeliest man aboard, and though he kept his old title, he served in a way as mate.
At first the passengers were much frightened, but Captain Anderson hastened to reassure them.
You must have had Miss Anderson in your eye, in describing an altered young lady.
And a very pretty story it is, and with more truth in it, I dare say, than does credit to Miss Anderson.
Students of criminology will remember the analogous incidents in Godno, in Little Russia, in the year '66, and of course there are the Anderson murders in North Carolina, but this case possesses some features which are entirely its own.
Paul's above the irregular spires of Ludgate Hill, she pulled the cord impulsively, and gave directions that Anderson should drive them there.
Hilbery pulled the cord with such decision that even Anderson had to listen to the order which she leant out of the window to give him.
John Anderson, My Jo'; reflective sentiment; feeling for nature; sympathy with animals; vigorous patriotism, as in 'Scots Wha Hae' (and Burns did much to revive the feeling of Scots for Scotland); deep tragedy and pathos; instinctive happiness; delightful humor; and the others.
In these prints and others of this time, Anderson was consolidating the images she could still trust.
Five years later, ensconced in a hotel room in Paraguay for three months with Ayers and their almost-adopted infant son, Raphael, Anderson pounded out the screenplay on her laptop while waiting for the bureaucratic breakthrough that would let them leave the country as a family.
Anderson said some months after the historic first treatment.