Andropov


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Related to Andropov: Chernenko

An·dro·pov

 (ăn-drŏp′ôf), Yuri 1914-1984.
Soviet politician who was general secretary of the Communist Party from 1982 to 1984.

Andropov

(ænˈdrɒpɒv; Russian ənˈdrɔːpəf)
n
(Placename) a former name (1984–91) for Rybinsk

Andropov

(ænˈdrɒpɒv; Russian ənˈdrɔːpəf)
n
(Biography) Yuri Vladimirovich. 1914–84, Soviet statesman; president of the Soviet Union (1983–84)

An•dro•pov

(ænˈdroʊ pɔf, -pɒf)
n.
a city in the W Russian Federation, NE of Moscow, on the Volga. 254,000. Formerly, Rybinsk (1958–84), Shcherbakov (1946–57).
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Primakov, a life-long communist and former chief of the KGB, was tutored under Josef Stalin and then served in the top echelons of the Soviet dictatorship in every successive Kremlin regime: Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Andropov, Chernenko, Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and now, Putin.
Procedure dictated he should inform his commander, who would signal the then Soviet leader Yuri Andropov to launch a counter-attack.
And if those clues weren't enough, there is a trail of corpses from Chechnya to London, as well as Putin's Soviet-style foreign and domestic policies that hearken to Brezhnev and Andropov, if not Stalin.
Open Competition: The right to enter into an Agreement for development of design estimates for the project: Overhaul of external networks, engineering systems, structures and premises podmostovyh spaces Nagatinskiy metro bridge (right and left bank), South of Moscow, Andropov Avenue.
Shortly after Yuri Andropov became head of state security in May 1967," notes the aforementioned Senate report, "Moscow adopted a policy of supplying training, arms, and ammunition in generous quantity to Syria and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) under Yasser Arafat.
Yuri Andropov (top right), longtime head of the Soviet KGB, the world's most ruthless secret police agency, found that the United Nations offered an ideal staging base for Soviet espionage, subversion, and terrorism.
Samantha was the 10-yearold girl from Manchester, Maine, who in 1982 wrote a letter to Yuri Andropov, the premier of the Soviet Union, asking if he planned to launch a nuclear war against the United States.
His candidacy had been mooted the previous year when Yuri Andropov died barely 15 months into his tenure, having succeeded the long-serving but also long-ailing Leonid Brezhnev.
Beyond Ukraine, the world faces a new, dangerous phase of East-West geopolitics a throwback to the Yuri Andropov USSR era.