Hail Mary

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Hail Mary

n. pl. Hail Marys
1. Roman Catholic Church A prayer based on the greetings of Gabriel and Saint Elizabeth to the Virgin Mary. Also called Ave Maria.
2. Football A long pass thrown in desperation, especially near the end of a game.

Hail Mary

n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Also called: Ave Maria a prayer to the Virgin Mary, based on the salutations of the angel Gabriel (Luke 1:28) and Elizabeth (Luke 1:42) to her
2. (American Football) American football slang a very long high pass into the end zone, made in the final seconds of a half or of a game

Hail′ Mar′y


n.
2. Also called Hail′ Mar′y pass` (or play`). a long forward pass in football, esp. as a last-ditch attempt at the end of a game, where completion is considered unlikely.
[1300–50; Middle English, translation of Medieval Latin Ave Maria]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hail Mary - a salutation to the Virgin Mary now used in prayers to herHail Mary - a salutation to the Virgin Mary now used in prayers to her
Translations

Hail Mary

n (= prayer) → Ave Maria m inv, Je vous salue Marie m inv

Hail Mary

nAve Maria f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Menthiere offers a commentary on the angelic salutation to Mary, Mother of God, as recorded in Luke's Gospel, together with the added petitions that eventually came to be known as the "Hail Mary.
Thomas Aquinas points out that the Angelic Salutation is actually made up of three parts, the third being the name of Mary, which was added later on by the Church, as was the name of Jesus.
The selection comprises seldom read texts such as the Sermons on the place and use of Holy Scripture, pronounced when Thomas became a master in sacred theology--they open the series of translations; questions about the nature of theology and the Six Days of Creation from the Commentary on the Sententioe; the admirable Prefaces to the commentaries on several works of Aristotle and the De divinis nominibus; sections from the exposition on the Liber de causis, the Peri Hermeneias, Paul's Letter to Philemon, and the commentary on the Angelic Salutation, which closes the book.