Anglicism


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An·gli·cism

also an·gli·cism  (ăng′glĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A word, phrase, or idiom characteristic of or peculiar to the English language.
b. A Briticism.
2. A typically English quality.

[From Medieval Latin Anglicus, English; see Anglican.]

Anglicism

(ˈæŋɡlɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Linguistics) a word, phrase, or idiom peculiar to the English language, esp as spoken in England
2. an English attitude, custom, etc
3. the fact or quality of being English

An•gli•cism

(ˈæŋ gləˌsɪz əm)

n. (sometimes l.c.)
1. a Briticism.
2. an English word, idiom, etc., occurring in or borrowed by another language.
3. the state of being English; characteristic English quality.
4. any custom, manner, idea, etc., characteristic of the English people.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin Anglic(us) English + -ism]

Anglicism

1. a word, idiom, or feature of the English language occurring in or borrowed by another language.
2. U.S. a Briticism.
3. any manner, idea, or custom typical of the English people. Also called Englishism.
See also: English
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anglicism - an expression that is used in Great Britain (especially as contrasted with American English)
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
2.Anglicism - a custom that is peculiar to England or its citizens
custom, usage, usance - accepted or habitual practice
Translations
англицизъм
anglicizamanglizam
anglicism

anglicism

[ˈæŋglɪsɪzəm] Nanglicismo m, inglesismo m

anglicism

nAnglizismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that, as regards type of Anglicism (that is, Anglicism proper or false Anglicism), their percentage of distribution in the CREA is quite similar (see Table 5).
Repeated use in Italian of an Anglicism promotes the creation of neologisms based on the loan word (e.
Hirvonen] The Anglicism Project: Background and methods.
Chapter 5, "Semi-automatic Approaches to Anglicism Detection in Norwegian Corpus Data', by Gisle Andersen, is an excellent article in several ways.
As has just been said, the pair dramatica(o)/mente / dramatic/ally is a paradigmatic example of the type of semantic Anglicism generally known as false friend (Prado, 2001), since it is the superficial similarity of the two forms that may lead to misuse in Spanish.
Thereby, by Anglicism we understand any term, meaning or structure adopted from British or American English without distinction, as well as words of other origins, but which entered in American Spanish by English.
Keywords: anglicism, borrowing, semantic function, adaptation, integration, lexical-semantic feature.
However, the case of-er fan base hybrid nouns is strikingly distinctive because of its purely native origin, that is, it is not based on an existing anglicism of the rocker-rockero type.
These usages in mind, it might be prudent not to read too much intent into the German translation of "high Crimes," since there is a general tendency of the draft's German translator to translate as literally as possible, and hereby to choose a cognate or even use an Anglicism, without giving much thought to the question of whether the cognate in the individual case would be the most appropriate German term to stand in for the original term.
Other scholars have also offered similar definitions in which the identification of anglicism with solely words or idiomatic phraseology is palpable (Lopez Morales, 1987; Stone, 1957).
sulumen), which will be subsequently either abandoned for French loans, or will become regionalisms or archaisms--with some exceptions, like the Turkish-origin term oja (nail polish) which survived and it is still used, in spite of the competion it gets from the Anglicism nail polish.
These public gatherings colloquially called mitines--which is an Anglicism from the word "meeting"--adapted to the crowd, environment, and space in which they developed.