Anglo-Catholicism


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Anglo-Catholicism

the praetiees in the Anglican communion that hold that Catholicism is inherent in a church whose episcopate is able to traee its line of descent from the apostles and whose faith Catholics agree to be revealed truth. — AngloCatholic, n., adj.
See also: Catholicism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anglo-Catholicism - a doctrine and practice within the Church of England emphasizing the Catholic tradition
Anglicanism - the faith and doctrine and practice of the Anglican Church
Translations

Anglo-Catholicism

[ˈæŋgləʊkəˈθɒlɪsɪzəm] Nanglocatolicismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Anglo-Catholicism, which found eloquent expression in John Henry Newman's writings and the Oxford Movement, argued that Anglicanism should acknowledge pre-Reformation teaching and more readily recognize its Catholic origins.
Socialism became especially associated with Anglo-Catholicism by the turn of the twentieth century.
A: Wales has a wealth of churches, ranging from Pentecostal congregations where people speak in tongues to Baptist congregations where the guitar amps are turned up to 11, to outposts of Anglo-Catholicism where the air is thick with incense.
All Saints Church had always been considered to be High Church in the Anglican tradition but by 1906 such was the leaning towards Anglo-Catholicism that the Bishop of York put an "Episcopal ban" on the church, which lasted 30 years.
Anglican sisterhoods began to gain popularity in the early part of the century, he says, partly due to the influence of the Oxford Movement and the growth of Anglo-Catholicism within the Church of England.
This experience began the development of his fastidious taste and Anglo-Catholicism and gave him the basis for a career as an ecclesiastical architect.
Ruth also wrote on Anglo-Catholicism, the unusual circumstances surrounding an election in 189091 to the See of Sydney and an article dealing with the highly controversial 'Red Book' case.
These two sections are invaluable and combined with the analysis of Anglo-Catholicism make this a first-rate study which should become essential reading for anyone seeking a real understanding of this great poet and playwright.
At a stroke, Anglo-Catholicism became English, patriotic and insular, rather than Roman, Italian and sinisterly post-Council of Trent.
A distinguished architect and ecclesiological scholar, John Ninian Comper (1864-1960) was a major influence on the liturgical revival when the Anglican Church was still imbued with a vital Anglo-Catholicism, now largely dissipated.