Anglo-Saxonism

Anglo-Saxonism

a belief in the innate superiority of the “Anglo-Saxon race.”
See also: Nationalism
anything characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race, especially any linguistic peculiarity that sterns from Old English and has not been affected by another language.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
The second longer section presents a series of readings focused Lyra's motherly triumvirate in Phil Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy anglo-saxonism in Harry Potter; the relevance of young adult literature; China Mieville and radical fantasy for children and young adults; postcolonial speculative fiction in Africa; race, gender and colonization in Nalo Hopkinson's Midnight Robber; the stories of Margo Lanagan; the politics of zombies in young-adult fiction; and the explosion of fantasy films in the 21st century.
In Gentleman's Agreement, directed by Elia Kazan, Peck was Phil Green-cum-Greenberg, a gentile journalist who goes undercover as a Jewish man to investigate anti-Semitism in New York and its affluent suburb, Darien, Connecticut--an epicenter of Anglo-Saxonism.
49-50; Audrey Smedley, Race in North America: Origins and Evolution of a Worldview (Boulder, CO, 1993); Reginald Horsman, Race and Manifest Destiny: The Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism (Cambridge, MA, 1981); Rodney Davenport and Christopher Saunders, South Africa: A Modern History (New York, 2000), p.
Schwyzer ably and rightly establishes that the English do not yet appeal to Anglo-Saxonism, and he ingeniously maintains that "Englishness" had no real underpinnings apart from "Britishness.
Sturgess offers an important context for the appropriation of Shakespeare in the book's assessment of Anglo-Saxonism in America.
Although some readers may recognize Steward's End of the World (1888), which challenged the Anglo-Saxonism of white Congregationalist Josiah Strong's Our Country (1886), Miller treats his public influence over a much more extended period.
The latter study will be particularly valued for its comprehensive, synthetic assessment of the jury's importance in the historical perception of English law as well as for its contribution to our understanding of Anglo-Saxonism.
These etymological books often combined Anglo-Saxonism and American nationalism to demonstrate both the American inheritance of the presumed superiority of the Anglo-Saxons and the ability of American culture to absorb foreign influences unsullied.
TV's Jim Royle, meanwhile, may rest assured his favourite epithet can be safely used when addressing council members and officers electronically, as can a popular six letter Anglo-Saxonism beginning with W.
14] Unlike most white American travelers to Rome, Douglass paid heed to racial mixture, and extolled not the triumph of Anglo-Saxonism but the miscegenated origins of Western civilization.
The origins of this tradition are covered in Reginald Horsman, Race and Manifest Destiny: The Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981).
In his book Race and Manifest Destiny: The Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism, Reginald Horsman (1981) points out how whites often associated the Anglo-Saxon "race" with conquest and liberty.