Anglocentric


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An·glo·cen·tric

 (ăng′glō-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
Centered or focused on England or the English, especially in relation to historical or cultural influence: "[His] view of American culture from its very origins is almost truculently Anglocentric" (Jack Miles).

An′glo·cen′trism n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The title of the present book, which appropriates the old Anglocentric moniker of "French and Indian War," is itself symptomatic of a work that is sadly rooted in outdated scholarship.
The constant policing, surveillance and erasure of such others is compared metaphorically with the Scottish nation and its historically uneasy relationship with Anglocentric hegemony.
The 20 tonnes of original, Anglocentric material is currently in a specially built, air-conditioned and atmospherically controlled containment unit in Greenwich, London.
This Anglocentric mindset ultimately underpinned Australia's entry into the First (Great) and Second World Wars, which remain to this day icons of Australia's national identity.
But the pleasure in my recognition of this familiar cultural terrain is even less possible to convey to the students today than it was when I started teaching; what was then condemned as the snobbery and culpable reticence of the wasp is now rightly criticized as Anglocentric, racist, or simply unintelligible.
Shakespeare was, not surprisingly, Anglocentric in his histories, but his tragedies and some of his comedies ranged widely across the known world, from Italy to Egypt.
The chapter concludes with reflections on Caliban's afterlife on the stage, especially in the wake of "[s]elf-congratulatory Anglocentric Darwinism" (257).
Research by Professor Anthony King and Cardiff University's School of Journalism highlighted the fact that some of our leading UK broadcasters often default to an Anglocentric position, a position which promotes policy issues affecting only England as though they apply to the whole of the UK.
also point to obvious disjunctions between media assertions of change and hope in an emerging post-racial society and what they see as a pernicious Anglocentric cultural, economic, linguistic, and political hegemony (Henry, 2012).
Francis Xavier University in 2011, plus five invited chapters and an introduction--means to redress outdated tendencies in Celtic Studies scholarship, including the perpetuation of an anglocentric master narrative that elides the "identity and historical experiences of Celtic-speaking peoples in the Americas" under those of their colonial rulers.
The London-based media are largely anglocentric in their reporting, covering decisions and strategies that are specifically English in their delivery and outcome.