Anglophobia


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Related to Anglophobia: Anglophobic

An·glo·phobe

 (ăng′glə-fōb′)
n.
One who dislikes or fears England, its people, or its culture.

An′glo·pho′bi·a n.
An′glo·pho′bic adj.

Anglophobia

a hatred or fear of England and things English. — Anglophobe, n., adj.
See also: England
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anglophobia - dislike (or fear) of Britain and British customs
dislike - a feeling of aversion or antipathy; "my dislike of him was instinctive"
Anglophilia - admiration for Britain and British customs
Translations

anglophobia

[ˌæŋgləʊˈfəʊbjə] Nanglofobia f

Anglophobia

nAnglophobie f (form), → Englandhass m
References in classic literature ?
Well, then, you shall have plenty of it; and first, I see you've not much more sense than some others of my acquaintance"(indicating me with his thumb), "or else you'd never turn rabid about that dirty little country called England; for rabid, I see you are; I read Anglophobia in your looks, and hear it in your words.
There is reason to believe that, while decrying any notion of direct rule from Westminster, Sinn Fein think it might yield massive concessions and encourage Anglophobia.
Indeed, Satta displayed a strong degree of Anglophobia.
He denied that Germany's naval build-up had been aimed at England and disputed that the outbreak of Anglophobia during the Boer War had been extraordinarily powerful.
Unlike so many other Irish nationalists, however, he never succumbed to Anglophobia or the cultural cringe behind it.
14) Asifa Hussain and William Miller, Multicultural nationalism: Islamophobia, Anglophobia, and devolution (Oxford, U.
This could only increase Dutch Anglophobia, which had been among the causes for the bloody VOC intervention in Blambangan in East Java.
41) Things seem to have changed in the inter-War era, with the Scots Renaissance, with MacDiarmid's polemical anglophobia and, less obtrusively perhaps in the academic sphere, with the new critical insights of G.
Against a background of anglophobia, Rebell's article makes way for an all-out critique of the "hypocritical puritanism of old Albion" (<< puritanisme hypocrite de la vieille Albion, >> Lormel, 61) and of those who Rebell labels as the "defenders of morality" (<< defenseurs de la morale >>, Rebell, 14):
In addition to appealing to an unpleasant undercurrent of Scottish Anglophobia, the SNP promises its electorate the prospect of policies that are far to the left of anything that Labour's prime ministerial candidate, Ed Miliband, could possibly deliver.
A Call to Arms: Propaganda, Public Opinion, and Newspapers in the Great War (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004); Matthew Stibbe, German Anglophobia and the Great War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001); David Welch, Germany, Propaganda and Total War, 1914-1918: The Sins of Omission (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2000).