Anglo-Saxon

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An·glo-Sax·on

(ăng′glō-săk′sən)
n.
1. A member of one of the Germanic peoples, the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes, who settled in Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries.
2. Any of the descendants of the Anglo-Saxons, who were dominant in England until the Norman Conquest of 1066.
4. A person of English ancestry.
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of Anglo-Saxons, their descendants, or their language or culture; English.

Anglo-Saxon

n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of any of the West Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) that settled in Britain from the 5th century ad and were dominant until the Norman conquest
2. (Languages) the language of these tribes. See Old English
3. any White person whose native language is English and whose cultural affiliations are those common to Britain and the US
4. informal plain blunt English, esp English containing taboo words
adj
5. (Linguistics) forming part of the Germanic element in Modern English: 'forget' is an Anglo-Saxon word.
6. (Peoples) of or relating to the Anglo-Saxons or the Old English language
7. (Languages) of or relating to the Anglo-Saxons or the Old English language
8. of or relating to the White Protestant culture of Britain, Australia, and the US
9. informal (of English speech or writing) plain and blunt
10. of or relating to Britain and the US, esp their common legal, political, and commercial cultures, as compared to continental Europe

An•glo-Sax•on

(ˈæŋ gloʊˈsæk sən)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of any of the kingdoms formed by the West Germanic peoples who invaded and occupied Britain in the 5th and 6th centuries a.d.
2. (formerly) Old English (def. 1).
3. plain and simple English; blunt, monosyllabic, or vulgar language.
4. a native of England, or a person of English ancestry, esp. in the U.S.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to the Anglo-Saxons, or to the period of Anglo-Saxon dominance in Britain, ending with the Norman Conquest in 1066.
6. of or pertaining to Great Britain together with countries colonized by Britons, where English is the dominant language and most of the population is of European descent, as the United States.
7. of English ancestry.
[1605–15; New Latin, Medieval Latin Anglo-Saxōnēs, Anglī Saxōnēs (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anglo-Saxon - a native or inhabitant of England prior to the Norman Conquest
Anglo-Saxon deity - (Anglo-Saxon mythology) a deity worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
2.Anglo-Saxon - a person of Anglo-Saxon (especially British) descent whose native tongue is English and whose culture is strongly influenced by English culture as in WASP for `White Anglo-Saxon Protestant'; "in the ninth century the Vikings began raiding the Anglo-Saxons in Britain"; "his ancestors were not just British, they were Anglo-Saxons"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
3.Anglo-Saxon - English prior to about 1100
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
West Saxon - a literary dialect of Old English
Anglian - one of the major dialects of Old English
Jutish, Kentish - one of the major dialects of Old English
Adj.1.Anglo-Saxon - of or relating to the Anglo-Saxons or their language; "Anglo-Saxon poetry"; "The Anglo-Saxon population of Scotland"
Translations

Anglo-Saxon

[ˈæŋgləʊˈsæksən]
A. ADJanglosajón
B. N
1. (= person) → anglosajón/ona m/f
2. (Ling) → anglosajón m
ANGLO-SAXON
La lengua anglosajona, Anglo-Saxon, también llamada Old English, se extendió en Inglaterra tras las invasiones de pueblos germánicos en el siglo V y continuó usándose hasta la conquista normanda de la isla. Hoy en día sigue siendo una parte importante del idioma inglés. Como ejemplos de palabras de origen anglosajón que aún se usan tenemos man, child, eat, love o harvest.
El término se usa también para describir el mundo angloparlante, sobre todo si tiene su origen o está muy influido por costumbres inglesas, si bien hay personas de origen escocés, irlandés, galés o minorías étnicas que prefieren no usarlo.

Anglo-Saxon

n
(Hist: = person) → Angelsachse m, → Angelsächsin f
(= language)Angelsächsisch nt

Anglo-Saxon

[ˈæŋgləʊˈsæksən] adj & nanglosassone m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
The collection dates from the time of the Last Kingdom, when the AngloSaxon kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex were fighting for their survival.
30pm, doors 8pm BEDE'S WORLD VISITOR CENTRE & ANGLOSAXON FARM, JARROW Church Bank (0191 489 2106) Hive Live Lounge: Nov 20, 6.
Nobes (1998) distinguishes between written law countries belonging mainly to the continental Europe and the common law countries following the AngloSaxon model.
Dating back to AngloSaxon times, the role of Sheriff is appointed by the Queen in an ancient ceremony.
When told that a building is AngloSaxon in date the sceptical archaeologist always questions which particular part of the building is meant.
Tolkien made the AngloSaxon inspiration of Earendil known very early: in his Letters, there are several references to the character's inspirations and sources: "His name is in actual origin Anglo-Saxon: earendel 'ray of light' applied sometimes to the morningstar, a name of ramified mythological connexions (now largely obscure)" (150n), and
The country's image of itself as a white, Christian, AngloSaxon country one that is distinct from its Asian neighbors in language and culture has been central to its national identity from the very beginning.
Il est tentant de penser que cette propension a la moderation et a la conciliation avec l'element anglosaxon apparaissait comme une strategie circonspecte pour ne pas susciter l'hostilite de la majorite anglaise et, accessoirement, celle de Rome.
Despite his participation in important exhibitions in Italy and Germany, Martini was little-known to the AngloSaxon world until he figured as an important presence in the 1989 Royal Academy exhibition dedicated to 20th-century Italian art and the Tate Gallery's On Classic Ground: Picasso, Leger, De Chirico and the Neui Classicism 1910-1930 in 1990.
The researchers were surprised to find that the older Iron Age men were genetically more similar to people living in Britain today than the AngloSaxon women were.
The collection also contains recordings of popular music with ballroom dances (foxtrot, tango, Charleston), French chanson, Anglosaxon music, folk music, variety music, Military music, and Film music, including recordings of Brussels singers.
The history student who reads Thucydides or Livy or the AngloSaxon chronicle takes part in an intensely human journey; the philosophy student who reads Augustine, Kant, and Kierkegaard participates in an equally human conversation.