aniconic

aniconic

(ˌænaɪˈkɒnɪk)
adj
(Art Terms) (of images of deities, symbols, etc) not portrayed in a human or animal form
[C19: from an- + iconic]
Translations
aniconique
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The paganistic creed uses aniconic representations of body parts, animals and other statues or items as symbols of the deity.
First there is a stunning 15th-century ink-and-gold Hajj certificate, which doubles as an aniconic portrayal of the Prophet Mohammed, his sandal at its foot, his shrine near the top.
Vital force achieves beauty most strikingly in calligraphy--as expected in aniconic Islam and climactically in the illuminations of the St Chad Gospels from Lichfield with their tight interlacings and knotty metamorphoses bustling and all but bursting from their pages.
In the early traditions of Buddhism, depictions of Gautama Buddha were neither iconic nor aniconic but depictions of empty space and absence.
Apparently, the microencapsulation strategy can produce MMT-reinforced aniconic PA6 matrices that are stronger and stiffer than the hydrolytic PA6 in the conventional clay hybrids.
But Anderson sees something rather different in Mondrian's work, which he said is rooted in deeply aniconic (avoiding idolatry) Protestant traditions.
Ishaq for violating Christian norms as articulated by the Nestorian katholikos (even though Hunayn's aniconic stance arguably brought him closer to the Muslim position on icons); (41) so, too, was al-Muhallabi impressed with Ibrahim's refusal to eat what Sabianism forbade (even though this distanced him from the Muslim position on permissible and forbidden foods).
24-26 Paul presents God as the aniconic creator of the world, and the source of all matter, the whole set to operate within fixed temporal and spatial boundaries.
In another early Buddhist context, Muchalinda rises above the vacant vajra throne under the Bodhi tree on an aniconic Shunga-dynasty pillar from Pauni, Maharashtra.
It is a form of aniconic archive, one that delegates the artist's life and work to the imagination of each viewer.
Looking in turn at secularity, monotheism, and transformation, they consider such topics as the law of God in a secular state: claiming space in the public domain, the aniconic God in Isaiah 43:10 and the contemporary discourse on monotheism, mystical christology from the perspective of pseudo-Dionysius and Taoism, some arguments in favor of prophetic discourse in civilizing democratic societies, and religion and the modern discourse about human dignity and human rights.
Because she includes the Glossed Gospels, excluded from Mary Dove's The First English Bible, the elaborately illustrated non-Wycliffite glossed Gospels (Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, MS 32) deserve a footnote, in particular because the manuscript is a major exception to Kennedy's contention that Bibles were largely aniconic in England.