animal husbandry

(redirected from Animal culture)
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Related to Animal culture: tissue culture

animal husbandry

n.
The branch of agriculture concerned with the care and breeding of domestic animals such as cattle, hogs, sheep, and horses.

animal husbandry

n
(Agriculture) the science of breeding, rearing, and caring for farm animals

an′imal hus′bandry


n.
the scientific study or the practice of breeding and tending domestic animals, esp. farm animals.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animalsanimal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
calk - provide with calks; "calk horse shoes"
stand - be available for stud services; "male domestic animals such as stallions serve selected females"
breed, cover - copulate with a female, used especially of horses; "The horse covers the mare"
yoke - put a yoke on or join with a yoke; "Yoke the draft horses together"
inspan - attach a yoke or harness to; "inspan the draft animals"
unyoke - remove the yoke from; "unyoke the cow"
outspan - remove the yoke or harness from; "outspan the draft animals"
harness, tackle - put a harness; "harness the horse"
unharness - remove the harness from; "unharness a horse"
yoke, link - link with or as with a yoke; "yoke the oxen together"
yoke - become joined or linked together
plant - place into a river; "plant fish"
restock - stock again; "He restocked his land with pheasants"
stock - supply with livestock; "stock a farm"
stock - supply with fish; "stock a lake"
stable - shelter in a stable; "stable horses"
Translations

animal husbandry

nViehwirtschaft f

animal husbandry

nallevamento di animali
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract awarded for Companion animal culture center construction work (architecture, Civil engineering, Landscape, Machine)
Their sophisticated hunting techniques and vocal behaviours, which are often specific to a particular group and passed across generations, have been described as manifestations of animal culture.
During archaeological excavations, experts have also found striking information on animal culture, such as the meat of many animals, like horses and wild donkeys were eaten in the ancient era.

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