physiology

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phys·i·ol·o·gy

 (fĭz′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts.
2. All the functions of a living organism or any of its parts.

phys′i·ol′o·gist n.

physiology

(ˌfɪzɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Physiology) the branch of science concerned with the functioning of organisms
2. (Physiology) the processes and functions of all or part of an organism
[C16: from Latin physiologia, from Greek]
ˌphysiˈologist n

phys•i•ol•o•gy

(ˌfɪz iˈɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the branch of biology dealing with the functions and activities of living organisms and their parts.
2. the organic processes or functions in an organism or its parts.
[1555–65; < Latin physiologia < Greek physiología science of natural causes]

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fĭz′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of an organism's vital functions, such as circulation, respiration, and digestion.

physiology

1. the branch of medical science that studies the functions of living organisms or their parts.
2. the organic processes or functions of an organism or any of its parts. — physiologist, n. — physiologic, physiological, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties
the branch of biology that studies the functions and vital processes of living organisms. — physiologist, n. — physiologic, physiological, adj.
See also: Life

physiology

1. The study of the functioning of organisms.
2. Study of how organisms work.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organismsphysiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
accommodation - (physiology) the automatic adjustment in focal length of the natural lens of the eye
adaptation - (physiology) the responsive adjustment of a sense organ (as the eye) to varying conditions (as of light)
abduction - (physiology) moving of a body part away from the central axis of the body
adduction - (physiology) moving of a body part toward the central axis of the body
contraction, muscle contraction, muscular contraction - (physiology) a shortening or tensing of a part or organ (especially of a muscle or muscle fiber)
control - (physiology) regulation or maintenance of a function or action or reflex etc; "the timing and control of his movements were unimpaired"; "he had lost control of his sphincters"
antagonistic muscle - (physiology) a muscle that opposes the action of another; "the biceps and triceps are antagonistic muscles"
humour, humor - (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile"
sensitivity, sensitiveness, sensibility - (physiology) responsiveness to external stimuli; the faculty of sensation; "sensitivity to pain"
localisation, localisation of function, localisation principle, localization of function, localization principle, localization - (physiology) the principle that specific functions have relatively circumscribed locations in some particular part or organ of the body
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
neurophysiology - the branch of neuroscience that studies the physiology of the nervous system
hemodynamics - the branch of physiology that studies the circulation of the blood and the forces involved
kinesiology - the branch of physiology that studies the mechanics and anatomy in relation to human movement
myology - the branch of physiology that studies muscles
irradiation - (physiology) the spread of sensory neural impulses in the cortex
cell death, necrobiosis - (physiology) the normal degeneration and death of living cells (as in various epithelial cells)
acid-base balance, acid-base equilibrium - (physiology) the normal equilibrium between acids and alkalis in the body; "with a normal acid-base balance in the body the blood is slightly alkaline"
autoregulation - (physiology) processes that maintain a generally constant physiological state in a cell or organism
inhibition - (physiology) the process whereby nerves can retard or prevent the functioning of an organ or part; "the inhibition of the heart by the vagus nerve"
nutrition - (physiology) the organic process of nourishing or being nourished; the processes by which an organism assimilates food and uses it for growth and maintenance
relaxation - (physiology) the gradual lengthening of inactive muscle or muscle fibers
stimulation - (physiology) the effect of a stimulus (on nerves or organs etc.)
summation - (physiology) the process whereby multiple stimuli can produce a response (in a muscle or nerve or other part) that one stimulus alone does not produce
homeostasis - (physiology) metabolic equilibrium actively maintained by several complex biological mechanisms that operate via the autonomic nervous system to offset disrupting changes
innervate - stimulate to action; "innervate a muscle or a nerve"
irritate - excite to some characteristic action or condition, such as motion, contraction, or nervous impulse, by the application of a stimulus; "irritate the glands of a leaf"
abducent, abducting - especially of muscles; drawing away from the midline of the body or from an adjacent part
adducent, adducting, adductive - especially of muscles; bringing together or drawing toward the midline of the body or toward an adjacent part
afferent - of nerves and nerve impulses; conveying sensory information from the sense organs to the CNS; "afferent nerves"; "afferent impulses"
efferent, motorial - of nerves and nerve impulses; conveying information away from the CNS; "efferent nerves and impulses"
isometric - of or involving muscular contraction in which tension increases while length remains constant
isotonic - of or involving muscular contraction in which tension is constant while length changes
voluntary - controlled by individual volition; "voluntary motions"; "voluntary muscles"
involuntary - controlled by the autonomic nervous system; without conscious control; "involuntary muscles"; "gave an involuntary start"
autacoidal - of or relating to an autacoid
pressor - increasing (or tending to increase) blood pressure; "pressor reflexes"
tonic - of or relating to or producing normal tone or tonus in muscles or tissue; "a tonic reflex"; "tonic muscle contraction"
sympathetic - of or relating to the sympathetic nervous system; "sympathetic neurons"; "sympathetic stimulation"
2.physiology - processes and functions of an organism
bodily property - an attribute of the body
facilitate - increase the likelihood of (a response); "The stimulus facilitates a delayed impulse"
Translations

physiology

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nfisiología f

physiology

[ˌfɪziˈɒlədʒi] nphysiologie f

physiology

nPhysiologie f

physiology

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nfisiologia

phys·i·ol·o·gy

n. fisiología, ciencia que estudia las funciones de los organismos vivos y los procesos químicos o físicos que los caracterizan.

physiology

n fisiología
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Norell earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in animal physiology from the University of California, San Diego; her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis.
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Nondance courses required: Six credits of classes in biological diversity, cell biology and biochemistry, animal physiology, nutrition, chemistry, biochemistry, physics or introduction to psychology.