animism

(redirected from Animistic Tradition)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Animistic Tradition: animism

an·i·mism

 (ăn′ə-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief in the existence of individual spirits that inhabit natural objects and phenomena.
2. The belief in the existence of spiritual beings that are separable or separate from bodies.
3. The hypothesis holding that an immaterial force animates the universe.

[From Latin anima, soul; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

an′i·mist n.
an′i·mis′tic adj.

animism

(ˈænɪˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the belief that natural objects, phenomena, and the universe itself have desires and intentions
2. (Philosophy) (in the philosophies of Plato and Pythagoras) the hypothesis that there is an immaterial force that animates the universe
[C19: from Latin anima vital breath, spirit]
ˈanimist n
animistic adj

an•i•mism

(ˈæn əˌmɪz əm)

n.
1. the belief that natural objects, natural phenomena, and the universe itself possess souls.
2. the belief that souls may exist apart from bodies.
3. belief in spiritual beings or agencies.
[1825–35; < Latin anim(a) (see anima) + -ism]
an′i•mist, n., adj.
an`i•mis′tic, adj.

animism

1. the belief that natural objects and phenomena and the universe itself possess souls and consciousness.
2. the belief in spiritual beings or agencies. — animist, n.animistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods

animism

A belief in the existence of spirits dwelling in natural phenomena such as animals, tree, mountains, or storms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.animism - the doctrine that all natural objects and the universe itself have souls; "animism is common among primitive peoples"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

animism

[ˈænɪmɪzəm] Nanimismo m

animism

nAnimismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Thai people followed animistic tradition before we accepted Buddhism.
Balinese Hinduism, the religion of over 90% of the population has roots in Indian Hinduism and in Buddhism, and adopted the animistic traditions of the indigenous people.
There is a clear great/small traditional orientation among most Asians such that there occurs a dialectic between local and broader regional traditions, and by-and-large the local traditions have fused or integrated with the larger regional patterns, particularly in the areas of religion where syncretism and synthesis between local, largely animistic traditions involving shamanism, magic and incantation, combined with more formal religious traditions involving priests, sacred texts and prayer.