antanaclasis


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antanaclasis

a repetition of words to resume the sense after a long parenthetical digression. See also rhetoric and rhetorical devices.
See also: Grammar
a rhetorical device in which the same word is repeated but with a different sense each time. See also grammar.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
References in periodicals archive ?
There are some kinds of pun which are antanaclasis , paronomasia , syllepsis.
An antanaclasis is a pun in which a word is repeated with a different meaning each time and the example of that kind of a pun is (Your argument is sound, nothing but sound).
Antanaclasis Joyceana en Ulises / Joycean Antanaclasis in Ulysses', in Caneda, Silva & Urdiales, pp.
As for metaphorical substitutions and puns, Lanham groups them together, and Carlin's exemplifications include euphemisms, meiosis, and antanaclasis.
All of the figures mentioned so far demonstrate Carlin's magnificent sensitivity to prose written and spoken; the same is true of the devices of repetition: antanaclasis, ploce, polysyndeton, antimetabole, polyptoton, pseudo-zeugma.
The author's fascination with the paronomasial in its various shades (adianoeta, asteismus, antanaclasis, adnominatio, polyptoton--to give but a taste of Nankov's rhetorical obsession) explains why his poetry is an ambivalent, ironic, and jingling firework of, as Hamlet might put it, words, words, words.
2) Further confusion may arise from the fact that modern terminology draws heavily on ancient and Renaissance rhetoric which, although lacked the notion of pun as such, made quite disorderly use of formal devices (principally paronomasia, antanaclasis, sillepsis and asteismus, corresponding roughly to individual pun types) lumped under the common name figura elocutionis (Freidhof 1984: 12; Kohl 1966: 55, 94; Redfern 1984: 82).
Including the antanaclasis on "air inspires," this language is suspiciously like that in which Raphael tells Adam about his birth--that God "breathed" life into his nostrils and he became a "living soul.
The rhetorics of Shakespeare's time distinguished a number of different kinds of phonetic, semantic, and syntactic overlapping, for example, paronomasia, antanaclasis, asteismus, and syllepsis.
When the word is repeated with the two different senses, we call the device antanaclasis.
frequently toys with her phrases to give them added interest, as in his repeated reworkings of Cary's favorite rhetorical flourish, an orthographic rebound known as the antanaclasis (so dubbed in Puttenham's Art of English Poesie [216-17]).
Antanaclasis, a closely related figure, occurs when the same word is repeated in consecutive, coordinated clauses or phrases with a different meaning the second time (Todoro and Ducrot 278).