Antarctica


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Ant·arc·ti·ca

 (ănt-ärk′tĭ-kə, -är′tĭ-)
A continent lying chiefly within the Antarctic Circle and asymmetrically centered on the South Pole. Some 95 percent of Antarctica is covered by an icecap averaging 1.6 km (1 mi) in thickness. The region was first explored in the early 1800s, and although there are no permanent settlements, many countries have made territorial claims. The Antarctic Treaty of 1959, signed by 12 nations, prohibited military operations on the continent and provided for the interchange of scientific data.

Ant·arc′tic adj. & n.
Usage Note: When pronounced carefully, Antarctica has two (t) sounds and two (k) sounds. In our 2005 survey, over three-fourths of the Usage Panel stated that the pronunciation in which the (t) sound is dropped from the first syllable is incorrect. A similar percentage disapproved of dropping the first (k) sound. Nevertheless, the consonant clusters in many English words (among them handkerchief and raspberry) have been simplified, so it should not be surprising that Antarctica should undergo a similar simplification, at least when pronounced in a conversational tempo.

Antarctica

(æntˈɑːktɪkə)
n
(Placename) a continent around the South Pole: consists of an ice-covered plateau, 1800–3000 m (6000 ft to 10 000 ft) above sea level, and mountain ranges rising to 4500 m (15 000 ft) with some volcanic peaks; average temperatures all below freezing and human settlement is confined to research stations. All political claims to the mainland are suspended under the Antarctic Treaty of 1959

Ant•arc•ti•ca

(æntˈɑrk tɪ kə, -ˈɑr tɪ-)

n.
the continent surrounding the South Pole: almost entirely covered by an ice sheet. ab. 5,000,000 sq. mi. (12,950,000 sq. km). Also called Antarc′tic Con′tinent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Antarctica - an extremely cold continent at the south pole almost entirely below the Antarctic CircleAntarctica - an extremely cold continent at the south pole almost entirely below the Antarctic Circle; covered by an ice cap up to 13,000 feet deep; "Antarctica is twice the size of Australia"
Antarctic, Antarctic Zone, South Frigid Zone - the region around the south pole: Antarctica and surrounding waters
Adelie Coast, Adelie Land, Terre Adelie - a costal region of Antarctica to the south of Australia; noted for its large colonies of penguins
Coats Land - a region of western Antarctica along the southeastern shore of the Weddell Sea
Enderby Land - a region of Antarctica between Queen Maud Land and Wilkes Land; claimed by Australia
Queen Maud Land - a region of Antarctica between Enderby Land and the Weddell Sea; claimed by Norway
South Pole - the southernmost point of the Earth's axis
Victoria Land - a mountainous area of Antarctica bounded by the Ross Sea and Wilkes Land
Wilkes Land - a coastal region of Antarctica on the Indian Ocean to the south of Australia; most of the territory is claimed by Australia
Admiralty Range - mountains in Antarctica to the north of Victoria Land
Antarctic Peninsula, Palmer Peninsula - a large peninsula of Antarctica that extends some 1200 miles north toward South America; separates the Weddell Sea from the South Pacific
Ross Sea - an arm of the southern Pacific Ocean in Antarctica
Translations
Antarktida
Antarktis
Antarktis
Antarktika
南極大陸
남극 대륙
Antarktis
บริเวณขั้วโลกใต้
châu Nam Cực

Antarctica

[æntˈɑːktɪkə] NAntártida f

Antarctica

[æntˈɑːrktɪkə] nl'Antarctique m

Antarctica

ndie Antarktis

Antarctica

[æntˈɑːktɪkə] nAntartide f

Antarctica

القَارَة القُطْبِيَّة الـجَنوبِيَّة Antarktida Antarktis Antarktik Ανταρκτική Antártica, la Antártida Antarktis Antarctique Antarktika Antartide 南極大陸 남극 대륙 Antarctica Antarktis Antarktyda Antárctida, continente Antártico Антарктида Antarktis บริเวณขั้วโลกใต้ Antarktika châu Nam Cực 南极洲
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This whale, among the English of old vaguely known as the Trumpa whale, and the Physeter whale, and the Anvil Headed whale, is the present Cachalot of the French, and the Pottsfich of the Germans, and the Macrocephalus of the Long Words.
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