anther

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Related to Anthers: androecium

an·ther

 (ăn′thər)
n.
The pollen-bearing part of a stamen.

[Medieval Latin anthēra, pollen, from Latin, a medicine extracted from flowers, from Greek, from feminine of anthēros, flowery, from anthos, flower.]

anther

(ˈænθə)
n
(Botany) the terminal part of a stamen consisting usually of two lobes each containing two sacs in which the pollen matures
[C18: from New Latin anthēra, from Latin: a remedy prepared from flowers, from Greek, from anthēros flowery, from anthos flower]
ˈantheral adj

an•ther

(ˈæn θər)

n.
the pollen-bearing part of a stamen.
[1545–55; < New Latin anthēra < Greek, feminine of anthērós flowery, akin to antheîn to bloom]
an′ther•al, adj.
an′ther•less, adj.

an·ther

(ăn′thər)
The pollen-bearing part at the upper end of the stamen of a flower. See more at flower.

anther

A pollen-producing part of flower, found at the tip of the stamen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anther - the part of the stamen that contains pollenanther - the part of the stamen that contains pollen; usually borne on a stalk
stamen - the male reproductive organ of a flower
reproductive structure - the parts of a plant involved in its reproduction
Translations
antero
ponsi
pylnik

anther

[ˈænθəʳ] Nantera f

anther

n (Bot) → Staubbeutel m, → Anthere f (spec)

anther

[ˈænθəʳ] nantera
References in classic literature ?
We might have taken the case of insects visiting flowers for the sake of collecting pollen instead of nectar; and as pollen is formed for the sole object of fertilisation, its destruction appears a simple loss to the plant; yet if a little pollen were carried, at first occasionally and then habitually, by the pollen-devouring insects from flower to flower, and a cross thus effected, although nine-tenths of the pollen were destroyed, it might still be a great gain to the plant; and those individuals which produced more and more pollen, and had larger and larger anthers, would be selected.
Some holly-trees bear only male flowers, which have four stamens producing rather a small quantity of pollen, and a rudimentary pistil; other holly-trees bear only female flowers; these have a full-sized pistil, and four stamens with shrivelled anthers, in which not a grain of pollen can be detected.
Comparative development of aseptate and septate anthers of Annonaceae.
The "male" anthers are extracted from the stalk of wheat to cross-pollinate one species with another, in this case one of Lebanon's most vital crops.
anthers aten run an e but nce by Despite key players from their squad, the missing Panthers lined up with a strong team including Great Britain players Mark Horsman and Liam Corbett and European representative Josh Davey.
Anthers, female, filaments, male, ovary, petals, pollen (2), pollinating, sex & stigma.
The new variety follows extensive breeding work to produce a lily that retains the colour of the original but has shrunken anthers that do not produce pollen.
pollen The fine, powderlike material consisting of pollen grains, which is produced by the anthers of seed plants.
One of the cutest native plants is the American senna, an herbaceous legume that grows to about four feet and is covered in clusters of yellow pealike flowers against which the conspicuously black anthers form a speckling.
The striking feature of this taxon are the strong sweet fragrance produced by their flowers, the completely connate filaments that form a tubular structure, hiding the comparatively small pistil, and the anthers basally connate to each other, forming a stellate structure in a top view, and bearing a small central entrance-hole which certainly is the only access of the pollinator (probably an insect) to the internal chamber formed by the filaments, where the female organs are carefully protected.
Schisler, a plant pathologist in ARS's Crop Bioprotection Research Unit at Peoria, Illinois, the bacteria colonize the flower's anthers, or pollen-making structures, which naturally exude a smorgasbord of nutrients.