anthraquinone

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Related to Anthraquinones: Glycosides, anthraquinone glycosides, Flavonoids, Saponins, Terpenoids, Coumarins

an·thra·qui·none

 (ăn′thrə-kwĭ-nōn′, -kwĭn′ōn′)
n.
A yellow crystalline derivative of anthracene, C14H8O2, that is insoluble in water and used chiefly in the manufacture of dyes.

anthraquinone

(ˌænθrəkwɪˈnəʊn; -ˈkwɪnəʊn)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a yellow crystalline solid used in the manufacture of dyes, esp anthraquinone dyes, which have excellent colour properties. Formula: C6H4(CO)2C6H4
2. (Dyeing) a yellow crystalline solid used in the manufacture of dyes, esp anthraquinone dyes, which have excellent colour properties. Formula: C6H4(CO)2C6H4
[C19: anthra(cene) + quinone]

an•thra•qui•none

(ˌæn θrə kwəˈnoʊn, -ˈkwi noʊn, -ˈkwɪn oʊn)

n.
a yellow, water-insoluble, crystalline powder, C14H8O2: used chiefly in the manufacture of dyes.
[1880–85; anthra (cene) + quinone]
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Photodynamic properties of natural anthraquinones and quantum yields for (1) O(2) generation.
The Main constituents: Anthracenic derivates, free anthraquinones and anthracenosides, eterosides, minerals.
Anthraquinones are aromatic organic compounds, associated with a wide range of bioactivities including laxative, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects.
Two new anthraquinones from the seeds ofCassia occidentalis.
The sticky latex liquid is derived from the yellowish green pericyclic tubules that line the leaf (rind); this is the part that yields laxative anthraquinones [21,22].
Indeed, it has been recently reported that quinone-related derivatives such as some naturally occurring anthraquinones bind to subdomain IIA of HSA or BSA (bovine serum albumin) (Bi et al.
Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of reducing sugar, steroids, glycosides, flavonoids and anthraquinones in all the extracts.
Inhibition of MAO A and B by some plant-derived alkaloids, phenols and anthraquinones.
Ethnopharmacological screenings of these medicinal plants have shown that some of their anthraquinones (Sydiskis et al.
Although several classes of compounds have been investigated for their 5-LOX inhibitory activity, relatively few anthraquinones and their derivatives have been examined for their potential anti-inflammatory properties.
Morinda lucida stem bark, a known traditional antimalarial in the West African subregion, has been reported to contain anthraquinones and an unidentified antineoplastic agent (Koumaglo et al.
For example, active principles previously isolated from Caulis Polygoni multiflori extracts consisted mainly of anthraquinones (Liu et al.