homophobia

(redirected from Anti-gay harassment)
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ho·mo·pho·bi·a

 (hō′mə-fō′bē-ə)
n.
Fear, hatred, or mistrust of lesbians and gay men.


ho′mo·phobe′ n.
ho′mo·pho′bic adj.

homophobia

(ˌhəʊməʊˈfəʊbɪə)
n
(Psychology) intense hatred or fear of homosexuals or homosexuality
[C20: from homo(sexual) + -phobia]
ˈhomoˌphobe n
ˌhomoˈphobic adj

ho•mo•pho•bi•a

(ˌhoʊ məˈfoʊ bi ə)

n.
unreasoning fear of or antipathy toward homosexuals and homosexuality.
[1955–60; homo (sexual) + -phobia]
ho′mo•phobe`, n.
ho`mo•pho′bic, adj.

homophobia

fear of or apprension about homosexuality.
See also: Homosexuality
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homophobia - prejudice against (fear or dislike of) homosexual people and homosexuality
bias, prejudice, preconception - a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation
Translations
хомофобия
HomophobieAnthropophobie
antropofobiahomoviha
homofobija
homofobia
homofóbia
homofobijaхомофобија

homophobia

[ˈhɒməʊˈfəʊbɪə] Nhomofobia f

homophobia

[ˌhɒməˈfəʊbiə] nhomophobie f

homophobia

nHomophobie f

ho·mo·pho·bi·a

n. homofobia, temor o repulsión a los homosexuales.

homophobia

n homofobia
References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Department investigation into whether school officials allowed a harsh climate of anti-gay harassment .
The district lost in a suit filed by the ACLU in defense of a former district high school student who suffered anti-gay harassment from teachers and staff.
Gay, lesbian and bisexual youth are more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to feel isolated, depressed, and suicidal, due in part to anti-gay harassment and bigotry.
Gay fourth-year student David Reid says he's experienced anti-gay harassment around campus, including an incident in which a group of men told him to "get AIDS .
Most of the research measuring the incidence or prevalence of anti-gay harassment, discrimination, and victimization has been conducted in school settings and few studies of older populations have been sufficiently large enough to provide accurate rates of discrimination and victimization or to identify demographic subgroups who may be at high risk.