holism

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ho·lism

 (hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

(ˈhəʊlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) any doctrine that a system may have properties over and above those of its parts and their organization
2. (Medicine) the treatment of any subject as a whole integrated system, esp, in medicine, the consideration of the complete person, physically and psychologically, in the treatment of a disease. See also alternative medicine
3. (Philosophy) philosophy one of a number of methodological theses holding that the significance of the parts can only be understood in terms of their contribution to the significance of the whole and that the latter must therefore be epistemologically prior. Compare reductionism, atomism2
[C20: from holo- + -ism]

ho•lism

(ˈhoʊ lɪz əm)

n.
1. the theory that whole entities have an existence other than as the mere sum of their parts.
2. an approach to healing or health care, often involving therapies outside the mainstream of medicine, in which isolated symptoms or conditions are considered secondary to one's total physical and psychological state.
[< Greek hól(os) whole + -ism]
ho′list, n.

holism

the theory that whole entities, as fundamental components of reality, have an existence other than as the mere sum of their parts. Cf. organicism.holist, n.holistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holism - the theory that the parts of any whole cannot exist and cannot be understood except in their relation to the whole; "holism holds that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts"; "holistic theory has been applied to ecology and language and mental states"
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
organicism - theory that the total organization of an organism rather than the functioning of individual organs is the determinant of life processes
configurationism, Gestalt psychology - (psychology) a theory of psychology that emphasizes the importance of configurational properties
atomist theory, atomistic theory, atomic theory, atomism - (chemistry) any theory in which all matter is composed of tiny discrete finite indivisible indestructible particles; "the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus and Epicurus held atomic theories of the universe"
Translations
holismo

holism

[ˈhəʊlɪzəm] nholisme m

holism

nHolismus m

holism

n holismo
References in periodicals archive ?
While I appreciate his anti-reductionist approach, allowing for the complexity and diversity of the created world, I do not find the analogical approach particularly convincing.
Seen in this way, the impossibility result has anti-reductionist implications, at least to the following extent: the most initially promising routes by which one might hope to reduce collective attitudes to those of the individuals making up the collective are ruled out.
16) Hence the epigraph, due to Butler (1765: xxvii), of Moore's anti-reductionist Principia Ethica "Every thing is what it is and not another thing.
This is in keeping with her understanding of Herodotus' anti-reductionist and provocative relationship with his audience.
An Anti-Reductionist Account of Singular Causation, MICHAEL ROTA
The scientists, Lev Vygotsky, James Baldwin, James Gibson, and Kurt Lewin, argued for an empirical method and an anti-reductionist stance.
Here, his anti-reductionist science was clearly informed by political ideology.
Schumacher, drew upon humanity's great wisdom traditions to recapture an understanding of this anti-reductionist attentiveness to what is, moving easily among scholastic, Hindu, Taoist, and Buddhist thought.

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