antifederalist

(redirected from Antifederalists)

an·ti·fed·er·al·ist

also An·ti·fed·er·al·ist  (ăn′tē-fĕd′ər-ə-lĭst, -fĕd′rə-lĭst, ăn′tī-)
n.
An opponent of the ratification of the US Constitution.

an′ti·fed′er·al·ist adj.
an′ti·fed′er·al·ism n.

Antifederalist

(ˌæntɪˈfɛdərəlɪst; -ˈfɛdrə-)
n
1. (Historical Terms) history US a person who opposed the ratification of the Constitution in 1789 and thereafter allied with Thomas Jefferson's Antifederal Party, which opposed extension of the powers of the federal Government
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) history US a person who opposed the ratification of the Constitution in 1789 and thereafter allied with Thomas Jefferson's Antifederal Party, which opposed extension of the powers of the federal Government
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often not capital) any person who opposes federalism

An•ti•fed•er•al•ist

(ˌæn tiˈfɛd ər ə lɪst, -ˈfɛd rə-, ˌæn taɪ-)

n.
1. a member of a group that before 1789 opposed the adoption of the U.S. Constitution and after that favored its strict construction.
2. (l.c.) an opponent of federalism.
[1780–90; Amer.]
An`ti•fed′er•al•ism, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
1961); News Paper Report of Amendments Proposed to the Constitution by Antifederalist Convention Delegates between 20 and 26 June 1788, supra note 159, at 2029 (opining that the New York antifederalists believed that they could dictate conditional amendments to the Constitution despite their clear mathematical disadvantage in delegates); Robert G.
He had to overcome not only Antifederalists but also supporters of the Constitution who saw no need for a Bill of Rights because they wanted to give the new government a chance to function first, or because they saw revenue measures and government operations as more important than individual liberties.
148) This controversial provision survived the passage of the Constitution to the dismay of many Antifederalists.
So too the assertion that prominent Antifederalists wanted to break up the Union has been used to besmirch various prominent men of that appellation--never mind that there is not one shred of evidence that Patrick Henry, George Clinton, Rawlins Lowndes, or Willie Jones wanted an independent Virginia, New York, South Carolina, or North Carolina.
195, 208 (2000) ("Madison and his colleagues in the First Congress emphatically rejected the goals and the language of the Pennsylvania Antifederalists on these issues.
For example, during the bitter ratification debates between the federalists and the antifederalists, the Constitution's copyright clause generated almost no scrutiny.
Nelson reviews the ratification debates, in which Antifederalists continued criticizing the presidency, while Federalists, and Hamilton in particular, defended it by depicting its powers as less than those of either the British king or New York's governor.
The uncertain scope and status of the necessary and proper power have permitted the Court to use the power as a means of constraining federal regulatory power, rather than-as the Antifederalists feared, and as Marshall hoped--as a textual and structural foundation for the principle that the government of the Union is supreme within its defined sphere.
Other Antifederalists charged that the President was not strong or independent enough to resist the machinations of the Senate.
That is why the Antifederalists feared and opposed the Constitution.
Like the Antifederalists before them, Occupy protesters understood assembly as an element of civic responsibility, (185) a duty incumbent upon citizens to challenge what is orthodox.
Both the Federalists and Antifederalists agreed upon the importance of trial by jury.