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Related to Antiochus: Antiochus II, Antiochus III the Great


A Seleucid dynasty ruling in Syria (280-64 bc). Its most important member was Antiochus III, known as "the Great" (242-187, ruled 223-187), who conquered much of Asia Minor but was defeated by the Romans in 190.


(ænˈtaɪ ə kəs)
1. Antiochus III, ( “the Great” ) 241?–187 B.C., king of Syria 223–187.
2. Antiochus IV, (Antiochus Epiphanes) died 164? B.C., king of Syria 175–164?.
References in classic literature ?
The Achaeans and Aetolians were kept friendly by them, the kingdom of Macedonia was humbled, Antiochus was driven out; yet the merits of the Achaeans and Aetolians never secured for them permission to increase their power, nor did the persuasions of Philip ever induce the Romans to be his friends without first humbling him, nor did the influence of Antiochus make them agree that he should retain any lordship over the country.
Therefore, the Romans, foreseeing troubles, dealt with them at once, and, even to avoid a war, would not let them come to a head, for they knew that war is not to be avoided, but is only to be put off to the advantage of others; moreover they wished to fight with Philip and Antiochus in Greece so as not to have to do it in Italy; they could have avoided both, but this they did not wish; nor did that ever please them which is for ever in the mouths of the wise ones of our time:--Let us enjoy the benefits of the time--but rather the benefits of their own valour and prudence, for time drives everything before it, and is able to bring with it good as well as evil, and evil as well as good.
It was built (although about this matter there is some dispute) by Seleucus Nicanor, the first king of the country after Alexander the Great, in memory of his father Antiochus, and became immediately the residence of the Syrian monarchy.
Why, my dear sir, that cameleopard is no other than Antiochus Epiphanes, Antiochus the Illustrious, King of Syria, and the most potent of all the autocrats of the East
Again, as Titus Livius noteth, in the case of Antiochus and the AEtolians, There are sometimes great effects, of cross lies; as if a man, that negotiates between two princes, to draw them to join in a war against the third, doth extol the forces of either of them, above measure, the one to the other: and sometimes he that deals between man and man, raiseth his own credit with both, by pretending greater interest than he hath in either.
Judaea now and all the Promised Land, Reduced a province under Roman yoke, Obeys Tiberius, nor is always ruled With temperate sway: oft have they violated The Temple, oft the Law, with foul affronts, Abominations rather, as did once Antiochus.
Antiochus, who ruled the empire from 175 BC until his death in 164 BC, forbade Jews from practicing their religion, and they in return refused to worship the Greek gods, starting an uprising and eventually rededicating the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.
Researchers have long debated over the location of the Acra, built more than 2,000 years ago by Antiochus Epiphanes, king of the Hellenised Seleucid empire.
In 62 BC, King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene built a tomb-sanctuary flanked by huge statues of himself, two lions, two eagles and various Greek, and Persian gods on the mountain top.
When he hears that Antiochus and his daughter have been burned to death by the gods, Pericles and Thaisa head to Tyre.
Matters came to a head in 168-166 BCE when the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes issued a series of decrees outlawing the practice of the Jewish faith, defiled the Temple with the "abomination that makes desolate," and installed a permanent military garrison in Jerusalem.