Antiochus IV


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Related to Antiochus IV: Mattathias, Hasmonean Dynasty, Maccabean revolt

Antiochus IV

n
(Biography) ?215–164 bc, Seleucid king of Syria (175–164), who attacked the Jews and provoked the revolt of the Maccabees
References in periodicals archive ?
amp;nbsp;The 8-day holiday celebrates the rededication of the second temple in Jerusalem following a massacre ordered by the Greek-Syrian King Antiochus IV that initially pushed Jews from the city.
Among the topics are Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the apocalypse of Enoch, Aum Shinrikyo (Shoko Asahara), cargo cults, feminist eschatology, four horsemen of the apocalypse, Kingdom of God/Kingdom of Heaven, the apocalypse in popular culture, and zombies.
A year ago, an excavation revealed the remnants of the Hakra, a fortress constructed by the Seleucid king Antiochus IV (the protagonist of the Chanukah story) in order to control the city and supervise the activities in the Temple.
Therein, the ancient author has offered an emotional history of the revolt of the Jews against the Seleucids, whose leader, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, was fiercely intent upon Hellenizing all under his command.
The story, as we all know, is that at the urging of the Tobiads, an assimilationist faction of Hellenist Jews, the Syrian-Greek monarch Antiochus IV Epiphanes invaded Judea and immediately set about abolishing all expressions of Judaism, including the dedication of an altar to Zeus in the Jewish temple in Jerusalem.
Let me share the tragic story of Antiochus IV, a Greek king of the Seleucid Empire (from 175 BC until his death in 164 BC) who invaded Jerusalem and slaughtered thousands of Israelites.
Unlike Thanksgiving, the much older holiday of Hanukkah lasts for eight days and celebrates the successful rebellion of the Maccabees against Antiochus IV Epiphanes.
Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the second Temple in Jerusalem, shortly after the Maccabees, a small group of Jewish rebel fighters, successfully revolted against King Antiochus IV in the second century B.
The 22 papers consider such topics as problematizing Greek colonization in the Eastern Mediterranean in the seventh and sixth centuries BC, the rule of Antiochus IV of Commangene in Cilicia, a diachronic analysis of Roman temples in Rough Cilicia, the ceramic evidence for connections between Rough Cilicia and northwestern Cyprus between about 200 BC and AD 200, rural habitat in the hinterland of Seleucia and Calycadnum during Late Antiquity, and research on ancient cities and buildings in Rough Cilicia.
These three early historical apocalypses used similar strategies of scriptural reinterpretation and historical overviews of past, present, and future in order to counter the violence, propaganda, and ideology of the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes.
The negative Jewish reaction to Antiochus IV Epiphanes' cultic innovation in the Jerusalem temple as described in 1 and 2 Maccabees and Daniel is Smith's parade example.