Hughes syndrome

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Related to Antiphospholipid syndrome: Hughes syndrome, Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

Hughes syndrome

(hjuːz)
n
(Medicine) a condition of the autoimmune system caused by antibodies reacting against phospholipids, leading to thrombosis
[C20: after Graham Hughes, British rheumatologist who described it in 1983]
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Thomas' Hospital in London, commented, "Since the discovery of this disease by Professor Graham Hughes in 1983, numerous breakthroughs have helped save lives and reduce childbirth complications for those suffering from antiphospholipid syndrome.
Antiphospholipid syndrome and central nervous system.
The published experience indicates that women with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) but not antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) have roughly a 15% rate of pregnancy loss in their first pregnancy, not much different from the 11% rate in the general population.
Diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome requires test results to be outside the reference interval on repeated determinations at least 12 weeks apart.
All women with RPL should be screened for antiphospholipid syndrome before the next pregnancy.
In other situations, such as suspicion of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, detection of LA may be required immediately regardless of the acute thrombotic event or the treatment.
As far as SLE and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) current recommendations include initial management with continuous heparin drip, pulse SoluMedrol followed by divided dose intravenous steroids and plasmapheresis.
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by a state of hypercoagulability that can potentially result in thrombosis of all segments of the vessel system, (1-3) and various hematological pathologies, such as thrombocytopenia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), bone marrow necrosis (BMN), and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been connected with this syndrome.
The former Byker Grove and Waterloo Road star was told she had antiphospholipid syndrome 22 weeks into her second pregnancy.
Experts finally diagnosed her condition - antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) - and told her that the "old wives' tale" about aspirin had actually worked.
Emma was born with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which made her blood prone to dangerous clotting.
People with Hughes - also known as antiphospholipid syndrome - are at greater risk from deep vein thrombosis, a stroke or heart attack.