antipsychiatry


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

antipsychiatry

(ˌæntɪsaɪˈkaɪətrɪ)
n
(Psychiatry) an approach to mental disorders that makes use of concepts derived from existentialism, psychoanalysis, and sociological theory
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, ECT has been stigmatized by the popular media and others in the profession, and by the antipsychiatry movement, he said.
Morris also includes this anecdote from Joel Kovel, a member of the antipsychiatry panel:
Any who have been around long enough will remember the rise of the antipsychiatry movement, the challenge of the application of the medical model to psychology, and the many other intersections of theory and practice.
He argues that prevailing psychiatric etiologies/treatments fail to address how existentially complex depression is, while also taking to task postmodernism and antipsychiatry for being similarly out of touch with the realities of depression and despair.
Facing criticisms from the antipsychiatry movement of the 1970s as well as the tumult, which prompted the removal of homosexuality from the DSM-II in 1973, Robert Spitzer, the chair of the task force for DSM-III revisions, moved away from causal and etiologically based accounts of disorder to symptom-based accounts which resulted in discrete diagnostic categories.
Wexler's commentary is particularly instructive: "Accordingly, mental health law has in large measure been part of the antipsychiatry movement, mistrust of the mental health disciplines and of their practitioners .
During the political consciousness-raising times of the 1960s and 1970s in several Western countries (parallel to movements such as antipsychiatry movement, second-wave feminism, and civil rights movement), lesbian and gay lifestyles became more possible and visible.
Such crises found expression not only in militant political activism, but in the cult of violence; (48) the cult of the irrational, (49) the embrace of sexual adventurism, (50) experimentation with drugs, (51) and the valorisation of marginality and madness as desirable conditions, as exemplified by the enormous influence enjoyed by the antipsychiatry of R.
Feminist Antipsychiatry Praxis--Women and the Movement(s): A Canadian Perspective.
She also gives the false impression that fringe groups represent psychiatric patients and their families rather than the well-respected National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, which she ultimately acknowledges as "one of the voices against the antipsychiatry extremism of consumer-survivors.
149) This sounds like some limp residue of the antipsychiatry movement of the 1960s that, enmeshed in Marxist ruminations about the "bourgeoisie," has somehow staggered into the 1990s.
The immense cultural power held by the antipsychiatry movement of the 1970s holds no sway here.