antipsychiatry


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antipsychiatry

(ˌæntɪsaɪˈkaɪətrɪ)
n
(Psychiatry) an approach to mental disorders that makes use of concepts derived from existentialism, psychoanalysis, and sociological theory
References in periodicals archive ?
Every year, there are protesters: antipsychiatry groups who feel our treatments offer more harm than good.
These misconceptions are further enforced by antipsychiatry groups and incorrect media information (P7 and P8).
While alternative portrayals of people diagnosed with mental illness and other concerns regarding any potential changes were raised, these were not effective--some of the most compelling individuals who spoke against the changes based on their own negative experiences with medications and their treatment by the mental health system were discredited as antipsychiatry protesters and scientologists (SCCS 2007b:53)--nor were they the majority perspective that was heard at the public hearings.
First, an antipsychiatry movement had gained momentum throughout the 1960s (Shorter, 1997).
Social media, the antipsychiatry movement, Internet forums, opinionated bloggers, and public figures gone viral--these are some current issues that shouldn't be ignored during training just because they aren't discussed in texts or academic journals.
But looking more closely, the concept of liaison psychiatry provides a clear medical sideline in a troubled moment, even of vehement appeals from antipsychiatry torrents unconsciously encouraged by some fellow, still frivolous flirting with some parascientific practices.
Morris also includes this anecdote from Joel Kovel, a member of the antipsychiatry panel:
Any who have been around long enough will remember the rise of the antipsychiatry movement, the challenge of the application of the medical model to psychology, and the many other intersections of theory and practice.
He argues that prevailing psychiatric etiologies/treatments fail to address how existentially complex depression is, while also taking to task postmodernism and antipsychiatry for being similarly out of touch with the realities of depression and despair.
Psychiatrists who oversee inpatient care are also pressurised to discharge patients as soon as possible, so the very old notion of 'incarceration' (that worn-out cliche from the antipsychiatry lobby) seems facile, to say the least.
To this extent Guattari develops a highly original form of antipsychiatry that compares to the work of R.