antisocial personality disorder

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Related to Antisocial tendencies: Dissocial

antisocial personality disorder

n.
A personality disorder characterized by chronic antisocial behavior and violation of the law and the rights of others.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antisocial personality disorder - a personality disorder characterized by amorality and lack of affectantisocial personality disorder - a personality disorder characterized by amorality and lack of affect; capable of violent acts without guilt feelings (`psychopathic personality' was once widely used but was superseded by `sociopathic personality' to indicate the social aspects of the disorder, but now `antisocial personality disorder' is the preferred term)
personality disorder - inflexible and maladaptive patterns of behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
By and large, the decline in drinking, driving and dating has been interpreted as evidence of timidity, laziness and antisocial tendencies.
Besides the alcoholic beverages consumption we mentioned before, the violent manifestations, psychic problems, jealousy, adherence to groups having antisocial tendencies are just a few of the characteristics of the analyzed crimes.
There are studies that show patients with schizophrenia with comorbid antisocial personality disorder had more brain damage (such as reduced volume of the thalamus) than patients with schizophrenia who have only mild antisocial tendencies.
1993), we assume the results reflect a true lack of between-groups mean difference in this specific dimension of social conduct--even though groups differed in prosocial and antisocial tendencies.
Inability to maintain friendships and failure to maintain healthy relations with class fellows are among the prominent antisocial tendencies of the hearing impaired children and adolescents.
Of the 1781 total participants, there were 726 who were diagnosed with antisocial tendencies including psychopathy and 747 control subjects.
In his efforts to prove her innocence, Roy finds himself drawn more to the outside world, making it necessary to overcome his agoraphobic and antisocial tendencies.
His antisocial tendencies, however, were pointed to by another female teenager from Queen's College, who claimed Gray had hacked into the school's computer system and deleted another student's GCSE coursework.