aorist

(redirected from Aorist tense)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Aorist tense: Aorist aspect

a·o·rist

 (ā′ər-ĭst)
n.
1. A form of a verb in some languages, such as Classical Greek, that expresses action without indicating its completion or continuation.
2. A form of a verb in some languages, such as Classical Greek or Sanskrit, that in the indicative mood expresses past action.

[From Greek aoristos, indefinite, aorist tense : a-, not; see a-1 + horistos, definable (from horizein, to define; see horizon).]

aorist

(ˈeɪərɪst; ˈɛərɪst)
n
(Grammar) grammar a tense of the verb in classical Greek and in certain other inflected languages, indicating past action without reference to whether the action involved was momentary or continuous. Compare perfect8, imperfect4
[C16: from Greek aoristos not limited, from a-1 + horistos restricted, from horizein to define]
ˌaoˈristic adj
ˌaoˈristically adv

a•o•rist

(ˈeɪ ə rɪst)

n.
1. a verb tense, as in Classical Greek, expressing action, esp. in the past, without further implication as to completion, duration, or repetition.
adj.
2. of or in this tense.
[1575–85; < Greek aóristos unlimited]
a`o•ris′tic, adj.
a`o•ris′ti•cal•ly, adv.

aorist

A simple past tense, especially in ancient Greek, that does not imply continuance or momentariness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aorist - a verb tense in some languages (classical Greek and Sanskrit) expressing action (especially past action) without indicating its completion or continuation
tense - a grammatical category of verbs used to express distinctions of time
Translations
Aorist
aoristni

aorist

[ˈɛərɪst] Naoristo m

aorist

nAorist m
References in periodicals archive ?
In the aorist tense, Nganasan follows the other Northern Samoyedic languages, and verbal endings attach directly to nouns and adjectives:
Whereas one thinks of a snapshot in the aorist tense, the individual snapshots that Sartre has gathered together provide instead a gerundive sense of the ancient world, illustrating the unity of the Greek world through its diversity and through time.
Literally Jesus entered the house in order "to stay" (meinai; aorist tense of the verb, therefore prolonged action), the probability of going up to Jerusalem on the same day being remote.