apagoge

apagoge

(ˌæpəˈɡəʊdʒɪ)
n
an indirect argument which serves to prove something by showing the contrary to be absurd or impossible

apagoge

a method of argument in which the proposition to be established is emphasized through the disproving of its contradiction; reductio ad absurdum.apagogic, adj.
See also: Argumentation
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in the accumulation will be proved by the apagoge in the following:
En el texto "Acerca de la clasificacion natural de los argumentos" (14), Peirce expone los tres metodos de razonar, que en la terminologia aristotelica son: epagoge, apodeixis, apagoge.
We use apagoge to prove (1), if there are subcircuits, at least two.
Apagoge, Endeixis and Ephegesis against Kakourgou, atimoi and Pheugontes: a study in the Athenian administration of justice in the fourth century B.
Apagoge, Endeixis, and Ephegesis against Kakourgoi, Atimoi, and Pheugontes: A Study in the Athenian Administration of Justice in the Fourth Century B.
461-516) (1), Peirce expone sobre los tres metodos de razonar, que en la terminologia aristotelica son: epagoge, apodeixis, apagoge.
Aristoteles llama apagoge a este tipo de razonamiento, termino que a veces se traduce como "reduccion" y que Peirce traduce como abduccion, mas recientemente se le ha denominado como: "retroduccion".
Hansen, Apagoge, Endeixis and Ephegesis against Kakourgoi, Atimoi and Pheugontes (Odense, 1976), p.
For brief discussion see MacDowell, Law, 73-5; at greater length see Mogens Herman Hansen, Apagoge, Endeixis and Ephegesis against Kakourgoi, Atimoi and Pheugontes: A Study in the Athenian Administration of Justice in the Fourth Century BC (Odense: Odense University Classical Studies, 1976), 55-90.
With the same apagoge as Theorem 1 in [14], we could prove that the optimal solution to the optimization of p must satisfy the following equivalent KKT conditions
It has been suggested, and is still suggested by Todd,(14) that the law is that dealing with kakourgon apagoge.
Most husbands resorted to a procedure known in Athenian law as apagoge, 'leading away', whereby the adultereer caught in the act was taken to the responsible magistrates, who, if he acknowledged his guilt, put him to death instantly, or, if he denied it, took him to trial.