apatite

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ap·a·tite

 (ăp′ə-tīt′)
n.
1. Any of a group of natural, variously colored calcium phosphate minerals containing fluorine, chlorine, or hydroxyl. These compounds form hexagonal crystals and are components of bones and teeth, are a source of phosphorus for plants, and are used in the manufacture of fertilizers.

[From Greek apatē, deceit (from its often being mistaken for other minerals).]

apatite

(ˈæpəˌtaɪt)
n
(Minerals) a pale green to purple mineral, found in igneous rocks and metamorphosed limestones. It is used in the manufacture of phosphorus, phosphates, and fertilizers. Composition: calcium fluorophosphate or calcium chlorophosphate. General formula: Ca5(PO4,CO3)3(F,OH,Cl). Crystal structure: hexagonal
[C19: from German Apatit, from Greek apatē deceit; from its misleading similarity to other minerals]

ap•a•tite

(ˈæp əˌtaɪt)

n.
a common mineral, calcium fluorophosphate, Ca5FP3O12, occurring in individual crystals and in masses and varying in color, formerly used in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers.
[1795–1805; < Greek apát(ē) trickery, fraud, deceit + -ite1]

ap·a·tite

(ăp′ə-tīt′)
A usually green, transparent mineral consisting mainly of calcium phosphate. Apatite occurs as hexagonal crystals in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, and is used as a source of phosphate for making fertilizers. It is the mineral used to represent a hardness of 5 on the Mohs scale.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apatite - a common complex mineral consisting of calcium fluoride phosphate or calcium chloride phosphate; a source of phosphorus
atomic number 15, P, phosphorus - a multivalent nonmetallic element of the nitrogen family that occurs commonly in inorganic phosphate rocks and as organic phosphates in all living cells; is highly reactive and occurs in several allotropic forms
atomic number 65, Tb, terbium - a metallic element of the rare earth group; used in lasers; occurs in apatite and monazite and xenotime and ytterbite
atomic number 69, thulium, Tm - a soft silvery metallic element of the rare earth group; isotope 170 emits X-rays and is used in small portable X-ray machines; it occurs in monazite and apatite and xenotime
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
fluorapatite - a form of apatite in which fluorine predominates over chlorine
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Silicate apatites are well-known hosts for highly-efficient, stable phosphors because of the peculiarities of their diverse crystal structure and good physical and chemical stability [8-14].
It discusses biological hard tissues in vertebrates, synthetic apatites, hard tissue-related biomimetism, and apatite-like biomimetic nanoceramics.
Estimation of the specic surface area of apatites in human mineralized tissues using 31 p mas NMR.
Blauwet loaned two apatites to the American Gemological Laboratories (AGL) for examination, and they were characterized by this author: a 3.
Mesquita RA found higher numbers of Argyrophilic Nucleolar Organizer Regions (AgNORs) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in ossifying fibroma than in peripheral ossifying fibroma indicating higher proliferative activity in ossifying fibroma, X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the mineral phase of both central and peripheral tissues consists of apatite crystals and that the crystallinity of these apatites is lower than that of bone apatite.
Rare earth element (REE) concentrations in biogenic apatites, including fossil bones, teeth and fish scales, have been used to infer palaeoseawater chemistry and redox conditions (e.
The subsequent analytical techniques for dating of apatites in the presented study are identical to the instructions described by Fitzgerald and Gleadow (1988, 1990) and Foster and Gleadow (1992).
Zinc, an essential trace element in bone, has been attempted in the field of substituted apatites by considering all nature of human bones.
Rey, Formation and evolution of hydrated surface layers of apatites, Key Engineering Materials, 284(3/6), 105-108 (2005).
Pete Richards and John Rakovan for their help in the study of the oddly shaped apatites; David London, Vandall King and Skip Simmons for their discussions with me about the formation of the apatite stacks; John Rakovan, Frank Hawthorne and Marcus Origlieri for their chemical analyses of the apatite-(CaOH); Frank and Wendy Melanson for their help in reviewing the text and for their business partnership on the big lot of apatite specimens; and Jacques P.
This study examined the influence of three types of phosphate apatites and two microbial amendments on Pb availability.