Apocopation


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The opposite of paragoge is common in Italian, and known as apocope or apocopation ("cor," "esser," "or").
Of course, despite the classical foundation of the English education system, Britain has given the world 'bus', which, in the good old days, was spelt with an initial apostrophe, deemed mandatory by Oxford grammarians on the grounds that 'bus' is a vulgar apocopation of the ancient dative plu- ral pronoun.
One has to note that Kuostrog and to some extent its north-eastern neighbors represented both phonetically and morphologically the most archaic part of East Livonian whereas in Sikrog, similarly to Ira and West Livonian, relatively late apocopation of the vowel o had taken place.
I did not know at the time that Yakan was a family name, so I understood it as the apocopation of 'Yakoun' [Ar.
For example, in Hebrew, as a result of an apocopation in which final short vowels were dropped, some pronominal suffixes lost their last vowel.
Luz 1986/87 suggests that the Talmudic form was derived from Oinomaos through apocopation of an original Inomos to Nimos, to which 'Ab' was added as honorary appellation.
Compay is an apocopation of the untranslatable term compadre (the Spanish word by which the godfather and godmother address the father of their godson or daughter, and by which the father and mother address the godfather).
There can be no doubt that elision did take place, at least in speech; but at least some instances of supposed elision were clearly apocopation, and this was reflected in singing.
Occasionally words of foreign origin involve <gn>, without <e> apocopation, as in Signal and Signatur, do not belong in this category, and have short vowels.