Apocryphon


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A·poc·ry·phon

 (ə-pŏk′rə-fən)
n.
Singular of Apocrypha.

[Greek apokruphon, neuter singular of apokruphos, hidden, unknown; see Apocrypha.]

apocryphon

(əˈpɒkrɪˌfɒn)
n, pl -pha (-fə)
something that is regarded as probably untrue
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include missing and misplaced: omission and transposition in the Book of Jubilees, the quantification of religious obligation in Second Temple Judaism and beyond, "wisdom motifs" in the compositional strategy of the Genesis Apocryphon (1Q20) and other Aramaic texts from Qumran, harmonizing and rewriting Daniel 6 from the Bible to Qumran, and Deuteronomy in the Temple Scroll and its use in the textual criticism of Deuteronomy.
This description shows only the most important features of the so-called Gnostic myth which many scholars believe to be fully expressed in the Apocryphon of John (NHC II, 1; III, 1; IV, 1; and BG 2), an early Sethian text.
think of "Freud" as an apocryphon, a form of Jewish and early
According to the Apocryphon of John, a Gnostic manuscript in Coptic found at Nag Hammadi in Egypt, the Unknown God, an androgynous Being, brings forth a spiritual world of Aeons, the last of which, Sophia, falls through lust out of the Divine Presence.
Examples of the latter include "The Qumran Manuscripts: Contents and Significance"; "The Vocabulary of the Qumran Sectarian Texts"; "Sectarian and Nonsectarian Texts from Qumran: The Pertinence and Use of a Taxonomy"; "Between Sectarian and Nonsectarian: The Case of the Apocryphon of Joshua"; "Between Qumran Sectarian and Qumran Nonsectarian Texts: The Case of Belial and Mastema"; and "Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha at Qumran.
Michiela, The Dead Sea Genesis Apocryphon (Leiden: Brill, 2009) pp.
Martin's Nova Mob-Sammy the Butcher, Hamburger Mary, Izzy the Push and all the rest--are the Gnostic archons, portrayed in The Apocryphon of John, also part of The Nag Hammadi Library, as seducing man through the creation of sexual desire, and through many other forms of what is called "counterfeit spirit" (119).
Pseudo-Cyril of Jerusalem on the life and the passion of Christ; a Coptic apocryphon.
Its title comes from the Apocryphon of John, a second century Gnostic gospel, where the "luminous Epinoia" is a heterodox version of Eve, a physical extension of Adam and a helper who will restore to him the full, creative vision of religious experience.
The book also contributes to scholarship on the particular early Christian texts that are at the heart of this work: namely, Hebrews, the Epistle to Diognetus, the Shepherd of Hermas, and the Apocryphon of James.
Also influenced by Enochic traditions at Qumran: the Genesis Apocryphon, 1Q19, 4Q180-181, 4Q247, the Damascus Document (see CD 2:16-20), Aramaic Levi, 1QH 12:29-40.
61) On the Aramaic (and Hebrew) substrata to the Apocryphon of