appellation

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Related to Appellations: Appalachian Mountains

ap·pel·la·tion

 (ăp′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1. A name, title, or designation.
2. A protected name under which a wine may be sold, indicating that the grapes used are of a specific kind from a specific district.
3. The act of naming.

[Middle English appelacion, from Old French appelation, from Latin appellātiō, appellātiōn-, from appellātus, past participle of appellāre, to entreat; see appeal. Sense 2, from French appellation (d'origine contrôlée), (registered vintage) trade name, from appellation, trade name, from Old French appelation.]

appellation

(ˌæpɪˈleɪʃən)
n
1. an identifying name or title
2. the act of naming or giving a title to

ap•pel•la•tion

(ˌæp əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
an identifying name, title, or designation.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French < Latin appellātiō]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.appellation - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from othersappellation - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
street name - an alternative name that a person chooses or is given (especially in inner city neighborhoods); "her street name is Bonbon"
byname, cognomen, moniker, nickname, sobriquet, soubriquet - a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name); "Joe's mother would not use his nickname and always called him Joseph"; "Henry's nickname was Slim"
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
title - an appellation signifying nobility; "`your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king"

appellation

noun (Formal) name, term, style, title, address, description, designation, epithet, sobriquet They called him the King of Pork. He never minded the appellation.

appellation

noun
The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
Translations

appellation

[ˌæpeˈleɪʃən] N (= name) → nombre m; (= title) → título m; [of wine] → denominación f de origen

appellation

nBezeichnung f, → Benennung f
References in classic literature ?
When it is remembered that the Dutch (who first settled New York), the English, and the French, all gave appellations to the tribes that dwelt within the country which is the scene of this story, and that the Indians not only gave different names to their enemies, but frequently to themselves, the cause of the confusion will be understood.
The merchants -- Pingree,Phillips, Shepard, Upton, Kimball, Bertram, Hunt -- these and many other names, which had such classic familiarity for my ear six months ago, -- these men of traffic, who seemed to occupy so important a position in the world -- how little time has it required to disconnect me from them all, not merely in act, but recollection It is with an effort that I recall the figures and appellations of these few.
Korak shouted down at him, calling him, in the language of the great apes, "Old green-eyed eater of carrion," "Brother of Dango," the hyena, and other choice appellations of jungle opprobrium.
They inherit, too, a fund of civility and complaisance; and, instead of that hardness and grossness which men in laborious life are apt to indulge towards each other, they are mutually obliging and accommodating; interchanging kind offices, yielding each other assistance and comfort in every emergency, and using the familiar appellations of "cousin" and "brother" when there is in fact no relationship.
that Proteus-like idea, with as many appellations as the nine-titled Corcyra
The master is not so called from his knowing how to manage his slave, but because he is so; for the same reason a slave and a freeman have their respective appellations.
These appellations signify simply 'the River,' according to the dialects of the countries through which it passes.
It is very well for natives to have a name for one among themselves, but it is not decent that they should call a white man by their heathenish appellations to his face.
Even if Pierre were not a Frenchman, having once received that loftiest of human appellations he could not renounce it, said the officer's look and tone.
Now, this gentleman had various endearing appellations among his intimate friends.
And so the appellation must at last have come to be bestowed upon the whale from which this spermaceti was really derived.
It is called slobgollion; an appellation original with the whalemen, and even so is the nature of the substance.