apricot

(redirected from Apricots)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

a·pri·cot

 (ăp′rĭ-kŏt′, ā′prĭ-)
n.
1.
a. A deciduous tree (Prunus armeniaca) native to Asia, having alternate leaves and clusters of usually white flowers.
b. The edible orange-yellow fruit of this tree.
2. A moderate, light, or strong orange to strong orange-yellow.

[Alteration of earlier abrecock, ultimately from Arabic al-barqūq, the plum : al-, the + barqūq, plum (from Greek praikokion, apricot, from Latin praecoquus, ripe early : prae-, pre- + coquere, to cook, ripen; see pekw- in Indo-European roots).]

apricot

(ˈeɪprɪˌkɒt)
n
1. (Plants) a rosaceous tree, Prunus armeniaca, native to Africa and W Asia, but widely cultivated for its edible fruit
2. (Plants) the downy yellow juicy edible fruit of this tree, which resembles a small peach
[C16: earlier apricock, from Portuguese (albricoque) or Spanish, from Arabic al-birqūq the apricot, from Late Greek praikokion, from Latin praecox early-ripening; see precocious]

ap•ri•cot

(ˈæp rɪˌkɒt, ˈeɪ prɪ-)

n.
1. the downy, yellowish orange, peachlike fruit of a small tree, Prunusarmeniaca, of the rose family.
2. the tree itself.
3. a pinkish yellow color.
[1545–55; < Middle French abricot < Portuguese albricoque or Sp albar(i)coque < Arabic al the + barqūq < Medieval Greek < Late Latin praecocquum, for Latin (persicum) praecox literally, early-ripening peach]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apricot - Asian tree having clusters of usually white blossoms and edible fruit resembling the peachapricot - Asian tree having clusters of usually white blossoms and edible fruit resembling the peach
genus Prunus, Prunus - a genus of shrubs and trees of the family Rosaceae that is widely distributed in temperate regions
Japanese apricot, mei, Prunus mume - Japanese ornamental tree with fragrant white or pink blossoms and small yellow fruits
common apricot, Prunus armeniaca - temperate zone tree bearing downy yellow to rosy fruits
black apricot, Prunus dasycarpa, purple apricot - small hybrid apricot of Asia and Asia Minor having purplish twigs and white flowers following by inferior purple fruit
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.apricot - downy yellow to rosy-colored fruit resembling a small peachapricot - downy yellow to rosy-colored fruit resembling a small peach
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
common apricot, Prunus armeniaca - temperate zone tree bearing downy yellow to rosy fruits
3.apricot - a shade of pink tinged with yellowapricot - a shade of pink tinged with yellow  
pink - a light shade of red
Translations
appelkoos
meruňka
abrikosabrikostræ
abrikoto
aprikoosiaprikoosipuu
abricotabricotierabricotière
खूबानी
marelica
sárgabaracksárgabarackfakajszibarackkajszibarackfa
aprikósa
アプリコット
살구
armeniacaarmeniacum
abrikosas
aprikoze
caiscaisă
marhuľa
marelica
aprikos
ลูกแอปริคอท
quả mơ

apricot

[ˈeɪprɪkɒt] N
1. (= fruit) → albaricoque m, chabacano m (Mex), damasco m (LAm)
2. (= tree) → albaricoquero m, chabacano m (Mex), damasco m (LAm)

apricot

[ˈeɪprɪkɒt] nabricot mapricot jam nconfiture f d'abricots

apricot

nAprikose f
adj (also apricot-coloured)aprikosenfarben attrAprikosen-; apricot jamAprikosenmarmelade f

apricot

[ˈeɪprɪˌkɒt] n (fruit) → albicocca
apricot tree → albicocco

apricot

(ˈeiprikot) noun
an orange-coloured fruit like a small peach.

apricot

مِشْمِش meruňka abrikos Aprikose βερίκοκο albaricoque aprikoosi abricot marelica albicocca アプリコット 살구 abrikoos aprikos morela damasco абрикос aprikos ลูกแอปริคอท kayısı quả mơ 杏子

apricot

n. albaricoque; Mex. chabacano.
References in classic literature ?
Caught in the pinch with a part sack of rice and a few pounds of dried apricots, rice and apricots was his menu three times a day for five days hand-running.
These almost impenetrable forests were composed of pomegranates, orange-trees, citrons, figs, olives, apricots, bananas, huge vines, whose blossoms and fruits rivaled each other in color and perfume.
Dame Nanette, look for those apricots which Madame de Longueville sent to us yesterday from Noisy and give half a dozen of them to your son, with a crust of new bread.
We got plenty of fresh oranges, lemons, figs, apricots, etc.
We had such a beautiful day, and such endless pictures of limpid lakes, and green hills and valleys, and majestic mountains, and milky cataracts dancing down the steeps and gleaming in the sun, that we could not help feeling sweet toward all the world; so we tried to drink all the milk, and eat all the grapes and apricots and berries, and buy all the bouquets of wild flowers which the little peasant boys and girls offered for sale; but we had to retire from this contract, for it was too heavy.
The next place she stopped at was a fruit and flower shop, and here she bought a large quantity of apples, apricots, peaches, and other things, with lilies, jasmine, and all sorts of sweet-smelling plants.
Last year I had four apricots -- they stole one, I had one nectarine, only one -- well, sir, they ate half of it on the wall; a splendid nectarine -- I never ate a better.
Hill-food is very simple, but with buckwheat and Indian corn, and rice and red pepper, and little fish out of the stream in the valley, and honey from the flue-like hives built in the stone walls, and dried apricots, and turmeric, and wild ginger, and bannocks of flour, a devout woman can make good things, and it was a full bowl that the priest carried to the Bhagat.
Portraits by Romney, seen through glass, have something of their pink, mellow look, their blooming softness, as of apricots hanging upon a red wall in the afternoon sun.
I could dawdle about in the nursery and count the apricots on the wall.
Norris's death that we put in the apricot against the stable wall, which is now grown such a noble tree, and getting to such perfection, sir," addressing herself then to Dr.
During this time one of our fathers, being always sick and of a constitution which the air of Abyssinia was very hurtful to, obtained a permission from our superiors to return to the Indies; I was willing to accompany him through part of his way, and went with him over a desert, at no great distance from my residence, where I found many trees loaded with a kind of fruit, called by the natives anchoy, about the bigness of an apricot, and very yellow, which is much eaten without any ill effect.