Aquileia


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A·qui·le·ia

 (ä′kwə-lā′ə, ä′kwē-lĕ′yä)
A town of northeast Italy near the Adriatic Sea. Founded by the Romans as a military outpost in 181 bc, it was frequently destroyed by invaders, including Attila (ad 452).

Aquileia

(ˌækwɪˈliːə)
n
(Placename) a town in NE Italy, at the head of the Adriatic: important Roman centre, founded in 181 bc. Pop: 3329 (2001)
References in classic literature ?
First Africa rebelled, then the Senate with all the people of Rome, and all Italy conspired against him, to which may be added his own army; this latter, besieging Aquileia and meeting with difficulties in taking it, were disgusted with his cruelties, and fearing him less when they found so many against him, murdered him.
The Church History of Rufinus of Aquileia, Books 10 and 11 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997), 20-23.
In an act of barbarity that made even the storming of Metz pale into insignificance, Attila slaughtered the inhabitants of Aquileia and destroyed the city root and branch.
New documents from Iron Age Iberia, in Archaeometallurgy in Europe: 2nd international conference, Aquileia, Italy, 17-21 June 2007: selected papers: 361-7.
The scenes of the vomiting and the gourd could be kept apart, as in the fourth century mosaic at Aquileia, for instance.
He analyzes the relationship between Old Roman and Gregorian chant, the manuscripts of the old rite of Aquileia, Gallican chant of Gaul and Spain, and Greco-Latin melodies and chants.
Via Aquileia (Zona Ind) 46/A Romans D'Isonzo (GO) 34076
Now that it is possible to study the original ceiling octagon painted by Francesco Salviati for the palace of Giovanni Grimani, the patriarch of Aquileia, at S Maria Formosa (Fig.
It should not escape our notice, in this regard, that this letter to Dandolo, though written in the confident dawn of Barbaro's brief but distinguished diplomatic career, nonetheless predates by only two years his dramatic jettisoning of that career through his acceptance of the patriarchate of Aquileia at the hands of Pope Innocent VIII.
In the first months of 1751 the Serenissima was constrained to accept an unfavorable conclusion to the disputes relative to the Patriarcate of Aquileia, in which she had opposed Pope Benedict XIV and the Hapsburg Empire: the widespread resentment in the confrontations with the pope, which this controversy had roused in particular among the so-called 'giovani,' not only was not erased by the agreement obtained, but on the contrary had continued to feed a powder magazine which was to explode in the anti-curial and anti-ecclesiastical battles of the two subsequent decades.
It takes its name from St Elisabeth (1207-31, canonized 1235), the Hungarian Princess who in 1221 married the second son of Hermann and Sophie, Landgrave Ludwig IV (ruled 1217-27), and through whose mediation the manuscript appears to have passed into the possession of her maternal uncle Berthold of Andechs, Patriarch of Aquileia (1218-51), and into the collection of the cathedral chapter at Cividale del Friuli, where it is now kept in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale as Cod.