arabesque

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ar·a·besque

 (ăr′ə-bĕsk′)
n.
1. A ballet position executed while standing on one straight leg with one arm extended forward and the other arm and leg extended backward.
2. A complex, ornate design of intertwined floral, foliate, and geometric figures.
3. Music An ornate, whimsical composition especially for piano.
4. An intricate or elaborate pattern or design: "the complex arabesque of a camera movement" (Nigel Andrews).
adj.
In the fashion of or formed as an arabesque.

[French, from Italian arabesco, in Arabian fashion, from Arabo, an Arab, from Latin Arabus, from Arabs; see Arab.]

arabesque

(ˌærəˈbɛsk)
n
1. (Ballet) ballet a classical position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and both arms stretched out in one of several conventional poses
2. (Classical Music) music a piece or movement with a highly ornamented or decorated melody
3. (Art Terms) arts
a. a type of curvilinear decoration in painting, metalwork, etc, with intricate intertwining leaf, flower, animal, or geometrical designs
b. a design of flowing lines
adj
4. (Ballet) designating, of, or decorated in this style
5. (Art Terms) designating, of, or decorated in this style
6. (Classical Music) designating, of, or decorated in this style
[C18: from French, from Italian arabesco in the Arabic style]

ar•a•besque

(ˌær əˈbɛsk)

n.
1. an ornamental style in which linear flowers, foliage, fruits, animals, and designs are represented in intricate patterns.
2. a pose in ballet in which the dancer stands on one leg with one arm extended in front and the other leg and arm extended behind.
3. a fanciful musical piece.
[1605–15; < French < Italian arabesco ornament in Islamic style, literally, Arabian]

arabesque

1. A pose as though poised for flight, supported on one leg, the other extended backward and the arms disposed harmoniously, usually with the greatest reach.
2. An ornate musical passage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arabesque - position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and arms outstretched in a conventional posearabesque - position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and arms outstretched in a conventional pose
ballet position - classical position of the body and especially the feet in ballet
2.arabesque - an ornament that interlaces simulated foliage in an intricate designarabesque - an ornament that interlaces simulated foliage in an intricate design
decoration, ornament, ornamentation - something used to beautify
Translations

arabesque

[ˌærəˈbesk] N (Ballet etc) → arabesco m

arabesque

nArabeske f

arabesque

[ˌærəˈbɛsk] narabesco
References in classic literature ?
Across the front of the house, and up the spreading eaves and along the fanciful railings of the shallow porch, are elaborate carvings--wreaths, fruits, arabesques, verses from Scripture, names, dates, etc.
It was a rather curious one of Moorish workmanship, made of dull silver inlaid with arabesques of burnished steel, and studded with coarse turquoises.
A luminous ceiling, decorated with light arabesques, shed a soft clear light over all the marvels accumulated in this museum.
His words were brief and expressive, conveying all that was meant, and no more; no embellishments, no embroidery, no arabesques.
As he struck the wall, pieces of stucco similar to that used in the ground work of arabesques broke off, and fell to the ground in flakes, exposing a large white stone.
He gazed at the gilded arabesques on the opposite wall, and then presently transferred his glance to Newman, as if he too were a large grotesque in a rather vulgar system of chamber-decoration.
Furniture had been made for it specially, upholstered in beautiful ribbed stuff, made to order, of dull gold colour with a pale blue tracery of arabesques and oval medallions enclosing Rita's monogram, repeated on the backs of chairs and sofas, and on the heavy curtains reaching from ceiling to floor.
One can distinguish on its ruins three sorts of lesions, all three of which cut into it at different depths; first, time, which has insensibly notched its surface here and there, and gnawed it everywhere; next, political and religious revolution, which, blind and wrathful by nature, have flung themselves tumultuously upon it, torn its rich garment of carving and sculpture, burst its rose windows, broken its necklace of arabesques and tiny figures, torn out its statues, sometimes because of their mitres, sometimes because of their crowns; lastly, fashions, even more grotesque and foolish, which, since the anarchical and splendid deviations of the Renaissance, have followed each other in the necessary decadence of architecture.
The friezes ornamented with arabesques, and the pediments which crowned the pilasters, conferred richness and grace on every part of the building, while the domes which surmounted the whole added proportion and majesty.
Elegant buffets made by Boulle, also purchased by the auctioneer, furnished the sides of the room, at the end of which sparkled the brass arabesques inlaid in tortoise-shell of the first tall clock that reappeared in the nineteenth century to claim honor for the masterpieces of the seventeenth.
His smallest acts were prepared and unexpected, his speeches grave, his sentences ominous like hints and complicated like arabesques.
Jacobs himself, familiarly known as Old Goggles, from his habit of wearing spectacles, imposed no painful awe; and if it was the property of snuffy old hypocrites like him to write like copperplate and surround their signatures with arabesques, to spell without forethought, and to spout "my name is Norval" without bungling, Tom, for his part, was glad he was not in danger of those mean accomplishments.