Arachne


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A·rach·ne

 (ə-răk′nē)
n. Greek Mythology
A young woman who was transformed into a spider by Athena for challenging her to a weaving contest.

Arachne

(əˈræknɪ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a maiden changed into a spider for having presumptuously challenged Athena to a weaving contest
[from Greek arakhnē spider]
References in periodicals archive ?
Fuerunt aliae fere innumerae ut Pasiphae, Berenice, Hermione, Penelope, Deidamia, Ersilia, uxor Romuli, Ero, Virginia, Anaxarete, Antigone, Arachne, Arethus, Arsinoe, Polixena, Pelagia, Lycaste, Iocasta, Hecuba, Cassandra, Hesperia, Cleopatra, Caelia, Ilia, heroinae et aliae prope infinitae, quarum aliae sola corporis pulchritudine, aliae vero non sola corporis forma sed etiam morum concinnitate ab historicis sunt decantatae.
Lenk is being literal: Playing Arachne, the show's magical spider-woman, she was suspended in a gigantic web throughout.
Further research led me to Oppenheim's collection of photographs in an online archive, the Arachne database at Cologne University.
as a graduate sociology student, and Arachne as a bus driver.
Thus this volume gives us Zeus and Europa, Perseus and Medusa, Theseus and Ariadne, Hades and Persephone, Athena and Arachne and, finally, Daedalus and Icarus.
Deucalion is just one of many artists Ovid shows transforming and animating materials in new ways: Pygmalion, Orpheus, Arachne, Marsyas .
The very few experimental writers in another vein than the realistic, such as those in the magazines Hilltop and Arachne, have obviously suffered from a lack of solid beams from which to spin their insubstantial webs.
The Babylonians, the Greeks and later the Romans all used sundials--the hemicyclium, the arachne, the antiboreum--but come a cloudy day, these were just clever paperweights.
The tapestry simile first reminds us of the old connection between textiles and texts, found in the Arachne myth and in the Latin etymon, texere, to weave.
Perhaps an even more archetypical representation of the act of speaking truth to power involves another Ovidian character who, like Philomela, communicated through images: Ovid's Arachne used the art of weaving to disclose the abuses of the gods in a contest against Minerva, the goddess of needlework, wisdom, and warfare.
From two acquaintances who strike up an email exchange that grows steadily more steamy, to Arachne taking on the goddess Athena in a sensual weaving competition, this spicy collection celebrates the complexity, playfulness, downright naughtiness and ingenuity of girls.
As the tanker enters the busy northern entrance of Haro Strait, it runs aground on Arachne Reef, slicing open the double hull and spilling 100,000 barrels of oil into an ocean teeming with life.