Arawak

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Related to Arawaks: Caribs

Ar·a·wak

 (ăr′ə-wäk′, -wăk′)
n. pl. Arawak or Ar·a·waks
1. A member of a South American Indian people formerly inhabiting much of the Greater Antilles and now living chiefly in certain regions of Guiana.
2. The Arawakan language of the Arawak.

Ar•a•wak

(ˈær əˌwɑk, -ˌwæk)

n., pl. -waks, (esp. collectively) -wak.
1. a member of an American Indian people formerly residing on the coast of Guiana and Trinidad: now living mainly in Guyana and Suriname.
2. the Arawakan language of this people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Arawak - a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South AmericaArawak - a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America
Amerindian, Native American - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrived
2.Arawak - a family of South American Indian languages spoken in northeastern South America
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Translations
Arawak
References in periodicals archive ?
This cave originally housed Amerindian Arawaks before serving as the hiding place for escaped slaves during the slave trade.
This historic attraction is said to be over 200,000 years old and originally housed Amerindian Arawaks before serving as the hiding place for escaped slaves during the slave trade.
Obviously, the Arawaks are aware of the spiritual nature attached to the tree--after all, they do call it the Tree of God--but Cliff leaves the search for a spiritual knowledge up to the reader.
Arawaks from South America had settled in Jamaica prior to Christopher Columbus' first arrival at the island in 1494.
This archeological model overlooked the fact that there were other groups prior to the Arawaks.
Columbus noted that "Canibes" (later modified to "Caribs") regularly ate human flesh and had all but extirpated the native Arawaks (later Taino) from the islands by the time he arrived on the scene, the old excuse ("He was dead when I got there, Inspector").
In 1634, the Dutch wrested control of the island from the Spaniards, who had previously grabbed it from the first inhabitants, the Arawaks.
To tell the story from the viewpoint of the Arawaks involves an Arawak-becoming.
Chapter 1 debunks the commonly-held notion that history started with the arrival of Columbus, which surprisingly is still found in official textbooks used in primary and secondary schools, even colleges; Chapters 2 and 3 smartly and concisely demonstrate that the Caribbean was not just inhabited by Arawaks (Tainos) and Caribs, but by a more complex mosaic of ethnicities, languages and cultural traditions.
Caribs, Aztecs, Arawaks, Incas and Mayans were all conquered and obliterated.
The indigenous Caribs, who had eradicated the more passive Arawaks, resisted European colonisation successfully for some time before they were suppressed by the French.
Risingham's recourse during the English Civil War to "arts, in Indian warfare tried," which he learned from the Caribs and Arawaks, and Scott's introductory note to Canto 3 referencing James Adair's History of the American Indians (1774), suggest a degree of transculturation more readily associated by readers with Byron's eastern heroes.