Arcadian


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Related to Arcadian: Acadian

Ar·ca·di·an

 (är-kā′dē-ən)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the ancient Greek region of Arcadia or its people, language, or culture.
2. often arcadian Rustic, peaceful, and simple; pastoral: a country life of arcadian contentment.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of the ancient Greek region of Arcadia.
2. often arcadian One who leads or prefers a simple, rural life.
3. The dialect of ancient Greek used in Arcadia.

Arcadian

(ɑːˈkeɪdɪən)
adj
1. (Poetry) of or relating to Arcadia or its inhabitants, esp the idealized Arcadia of pastoral poetry
2. (Placename) of or relating to Arcadia or its inhabitants, esp the idealized Arcadia of pastoral poetry
3. (Peoples) of or relating to Arcadia or its inhabitants, esp the idealized Arcadia of pastoral poetry
4. rustic or bucolic: a life of Arcadian simplicity.
n
5. (Peoples) an inhabitant of Arcadia
6. a person who leads or prefers a quiet simple rural life
Arˈcadianism n

Ar•ca•di•an

(ɑrˈkeɪ di ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Arcadia.
2. suggesting simple, innocent contentment.
n.
3. a native or inhabitant of Arcadia.
4. the dialect of ancient Greek spoken in Arcadia.
[1580–90]
Ar•ca′di•an•ism, n.
Ar•ca′di•an•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Arcadian - an inhabitant of Arcadia
Arcadia - a department of Greece in the central Peloponnese
Hellene, Greek - a native or inhabitant of Greece
Adj.1.arcadian - (used with regard to idealized country life) idyllically rustic; "a country life of arcadian contentment"; "a pleasant bucolic scene"; "charming in its pastoral setting"; "rustic tranquility"
rural - living in or characteristic of farming or country life; "rural people"; "large rural households"; "unpaved rural roads"; "an economy that is basically rural"

arcadian

also Arcadian
adjective
Of or relating to the countryside:
Informal: hick.
Translations
Arcadien

Arcadian

[ɑːˈkeɪdɪən]
A. ADJárcade, arcádico
B. Nárcade mf, arcadio/a m/f

Arcadian

adj (lit, fig)arkadisch

Arcadian

[ɑːˈkeɪdɪən]
1. adjarcadico/a
2. narcade m/f
References in classic literature ?
To me it seemed absolutely Arcadian, and I thought of Daphnis and Chloe and the early world.
He ceas'd; and th' Archangelic Power prepar'd For swift descent, with him the Cohort bright Of watchful Cherubim; four faces each Had, like a double JANUS, all thir shape Spangl'd with eyes more numerous then those Of ARGUS, and more wakeful then to drouze, Charm'd with ARCADIAN Pipe, the Pastoral Reed Of HERMES, or his opiate Rod.
The trouble was that in this Arcadian phase of my history, I, who had come through, case-hardened, from the other side of life, was timid and bashful.
Clearly when he does what the man is said to do in the tale of the Arcadian temple of Lycaean Zeus.
On which subject the young gentleman delivered himself in a language which might have very well become an Arcadian shepherd of old, and which appeared very extraordinary when proceeding from the lips of a modern fine gentleman; but he was only one by imitation, and meant by nature for a much better character.
And often she found herself dreaming of the arcadian days of her people, when they had not lived in cities nor been vexed with labor unions and employers' associations.
Nutty's views on farming and the Arcadian life generally were saddening to an enthusiast.
Ar rayed--I MUST say arrayed--arrayed artlessly in dazzling white paint as to wood and dark green as to ironwork the simple-minded distribution of these colours evoked the images of simple-minded peace, of arcadian felicity; and the childish comedy of disease and sorrow struck me sometimes as an abom inably real blot upon that ideal state.
You know I am a sordid piece of human nature, ready to sell myself at any time for any reasonable sum, and altogether incapable of any Arcadian proceeding whatever.
What secular want could the million or so of human beings whose daily labour, six days in the week, lay among these Arcadian objects, from the sweet sameness of which they had no escape between the cradle and the grave--what secular want could they possibly have upon their seventh day?
Many Arcadians, good soldiers, came in each one of them, but Agamemnon found them the ships in which to cross the sea, for they were not a people that occupied their business upon the waters.
You perceive, however, that he is neither a lamb, nor a goat, nor a satyr, neither has he much resemblance to the Pan of the Arcadians.