Arcadianism


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Arcadianism

the dress and conduct suitable to a pastoral existence, usually with reference to the idealized description of pastoral life in literature. — Arcadian, n., adj.
See also: Behavior
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Worries about the idealization of the land through tropes that have calcified into cliche and unthinking arcadianism are as old as pastoral itself.
While beyond the scope of Anglo-American postwar fiction in the mid to late 1920s, Patricia Rags essay "Double Sorrow: Proleptic Elegy and the End of Arcadianism in 1930s Britain" provides a useful study of pastoralism, repression, and traumatic elegy.
With regard to poetry, the Rococo style places particular emphasis on arcadianism, eroticism (Gies, "Mas sobre el erotismo rococo") and humour.
Where the baroque utilizes spectacle, celebrates allegorical and multivalent meanings, and speaks to the transcendent, Arcadianism, drawing on the pastoral, instead focuses on the pleasurable and charming, self-absorption, rationality and clarity.
paintings to represent ARCADIANISM, ACADEMIC ART, and CLASSICISM; and
From the top of the timelessly stylish Edwardian grandstand, you'll see why: the view of the verdant Shropshire hills is the essence of English Arcadianism distilled into a single image, looking very much the same, I imagine, in full colour as in the sepia tints of old.