Archimedes

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Ar·chi·me·des

 (är′kə-mē′dēz) 287?-212 bc.
Greek mathematician, engineer, and physicist. Among the most important intellectual figures of antiquity, he discovered formulas for the area and volume of various geometric figures, applied geometry to hydrostatics and mechanics, devised numerous ingenious mechanisms, such as the Archimedean screw, and discovered the principle of buoyancy.

Ar′chi·me′de·an (-mē′dē-ən, -mĭ-dē′-) adj.

Archimedes

(ˌɑːkɪˈmiːdiːz)
n
(Biography) ?287–212 bc, Greek mathematician and physicist of Syracuse, noted for his work in geometry, hydrostatics, and mechanics
Archimedean adj

Archimedes

(ˌɑːkɪˈmiːdiːz)
n
(Celestial Objects) a walled plain in the NE quadrant of the moon, about 80 km in diameter

Ar•chi•me•des

(ˌɑr kəˈmi diz)

n.
287?–212 B.C., Greek mathematician, physicist, and inventor.
Ar`chi•me•de′an, adj.

Ar·chi·me·des

(är′kə-mē′dēz)
287?-212 b.c. Greek mathematician, engineer, and inventor. He made numerous mathematical discoveries, including the ratio of the radius of a circle to its circumference as well as formulas for the areas and volumes of various geometric figures. Archimedes created the science of mechanics, devising the first general theory of levers and finding methods for determining the center of gravity of a variety of bodies.
Biography Archimedes would still be famous today even without the legend that he ran through the streets of his home in Sicily naked. One of his most important discoveries was that of buoyancy: an object placed in water displaces a volume of water equal to its own volume. The story goes that the king of Archimedes's hometown of Syracuse wanted Archimedes to test a golden crown to make sure it was made of pure gold (and not gold mixed with silver). According to the story, Archimedes puzzled over the problem until one day when he was taking a bath he saw how his body made the water overflow, and in a flash of insight discovered the principle of displacement. He dashed through the neighborhood yelling "Eureka!" (Greek for "I've found it!"), forgetting to dress first. He knew that gold was heavier than silver and now realized that a given weight of gold would have less volume—and therefore displace less water—than an equal weight of silver. He determined the volume of the crown from the volume of water it displaced, weighed the crown, and found that indeed it was too light to be made of pure gold.
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Noun1.Archimedes - Greek mathematician and physicist noted for his work in hydrostatics and mechanics and geometry (287-212 BC)Archimedes - Greek mathematician and physicist noted for his work in hydrostatics and mechanics and geometry (287-212 BC)
Translations

Archimedes

[ˌɑːkɪˈmiːdiːz] NArquímedes
Archimedes' screwrosca f de Arquímedes

Archimedes

nArchimedes m

Archimedes

[ˌɑːkɪˈmiːdiːz] nArchimede m