archer

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arch·er

 (är′chər)
n.
1. One that shoots with a bow and arrow.
2. Archer See Sagittarius.

[Middle English, from Old French archier, from Late Latin arcārius, alteration of arcuārius, maker of bows, from Latin arcus, bow.]

archer

(ˈɑːtʃə)
n
(Military) a person skilled in the use of a bow and arrow
[C13: from Old French archier, from Late Latin arcārius, from Latin arcus bow]

Archer

(ˈɑːtʃə)
n
(Astronomy) the Archer the constellation Sagittarius, the ninth sign of the zodiac

Archer

(ˈɑːtʃə)
n
1. (Biography) Frederick Scott. 1813–57, British inventor and sculptor. He developed (1851) the wet collodion photographic process, enabling multiple copies of pictures to be made
2. (Biography) Jeffrey (Howard), Baron Archer of Weston-Super-Mare. born 1940, British novelist and Conservative politician. He was an MP from 1969 until 1974. His novels include Kane and Abel (1979), Honour Among Thieves (1993), and The Fourth Estate (1996): from 2001 to 2003 he was imprisoned for perjury and attempting to pervert the course of justice
3. (Biography) William. 1856–1924, Scottish critic and dramatist: made the first English translations of Ibsen

arch•er

(ˈɑr tʃər)

n.
1. a person who shoots with a bow and arrow.
2. (cap.) the constellation or sign of Sagittarius.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French archier < Late Latin arcuārius=arcu(s) bow (see arc) + -ārius -ary]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.archer - a person who is expert in the use of a bow and arrowarcher - a person who is expert in the use of a bow and arrow
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
longbowman - a medieval English archer who used a longbow
2.archer - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in SagittariusArcher - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Sagittarius
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
astrology, star divination - a pseudoscience claiming divination by the positions of the planets and sun and moon
3.archer - the ninth sign of the zodiacArcher - the ninth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about November 22 to December 21

archer

noun bowman (archaic), toxophilite (formal) infantry, archers and cavalrymen
Translations
رامي السِّهام
lukostřeleclučištník
bueskytte
íjász
bogmaîur, bogaskytta
lankininkasšaudymas iš lanko
strēlnieks
łuczniczkałucznik
lukostrelec
okçu

archer

[ˈɑːtʃəʳ] Narquero/a m/f

archer

[ˈɑːrtʃər] narcher m

archer

nBogenschütze m/-schützin f; (Astron, Astrol) → Schütze m

archer

[ˈɑːtʃəʳ] narciere m

archer

(ˈaːtʃə) noun
a person who shoots with a bow and arrows.
ˈarchery noun
the art or sport of shooting with a bow.
References in classic literature ?
Four days hence, in Finsbury Fields, our good King Henry, of great renown, holdeth a grand shooting match, and all the most famous archers of merry England will be thereat.
Eightscore yards distant from the mark from which the archers were to shoot stood ten fair targets, each target marked by a flag of the color belonging to the band that was to shoot thereat.
When all was quiet a bugle sounded, and straightway the archers came marching in order from their tents.
So Sir Hugh spoke, and when he had done all the archers waved their bows aloft and shouted.
Down along one end were pitched gaily colored tents for the different bands of King's archers.
As the Queen had said aforetime, the King was mightily proud of his archers, and now held this tourney to show their skill and, mayhap, to recruit their forces.
The royal party had not yet put in an appearance, nor were any of the King's archers visible.
Lords and ladies of the realm followed; and finally, the ten companies of archers, whose progress round the field was greeted with hardly less applause than that given the King himself.
Newland Archer, during this brief episode, had been thrown into a strange state of embarrassment.
Archer knew that she had suddenly arrived from Europe a day or two previously; he had even heard from Miss Welland (not disapprovingly) that she had been to see poor Ellen, who was staying with old Mrs.
Newland Archer, as he mused on these things, had once more turned his eyes toward the Mingott box.
Few things seemed to Newland Archer more awful than an offence against "Taste," that far-off divinity of whom "Form" was the mere visible representative and vicegerent.