Argand diagram

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Argand diagram

(ˈɑːɡænd)
n
(Mathematics) maths a diagram in which complex numbers are represented by the points in the plane the coordinates of which are respectively the real and imaginary parts of the number, so that the number x + iy is represented by the point (x, y), or by the corresponding vector <x, y>. If the polar coordinates of (x, y) are (r, θ), r is the modulus and θ the argument of x + iy. See also amplitude5
[C19: named after Jean-Robert Argand (1768–1822), French mathematician]
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Roy first gives readers a background in Riemann's zeta function and von Magoldt's work on the xi functions, then turns to theory, explaining basic arithmetic functions, Argand diagrams, Euler identities, powers and logarithms, the hyperbolic function, standard integration with complex numbers, and line and contour integration.