argyll

(redirected from Argyleshire)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ar·gyle

also ar·gyll  (är′gīl′)
n.
1. A knitting pattern of varicolored, diamond-shaped areas on a solid background.
2. A sock knit in this pattern.

[After Clan Campbell of Argyle, Argyll, a former county of western Scotland, originally from the pattern of their tartan.]

Ar•gyll

(ɑrˈgaɪl)

n.
a historic county in W Scotland. Also called Ar•gyll•shire (ɑrˈgaɪl ʃɪər, -ʃər)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Argyll - a covered gravy holder of silver or other metal containing a detachable central vessel for hot water to keep the gravy warmargyll - a covered gravy holder of silver or other metal containing a detachable central vessel for hot water to keep the gravy warm
gravy boat, gravy holder, sauceboat, boat - a dish (often boat-shaped) for serving gravy or sauce
2.Argyll - a design consisting of a pattern of varicolored diamonds on a solid background (originally for knitted articles)argyll - a design consisting of a pattern of varicolored diamonds on a solid background (originally for knitted articles); patterned after the tartan of a clan in western Scotland
pattern, design, figure - a decorative or artistic work; "the coach had a design on the doors"
3.Argyll - a sock knitted or woven with an argyle design (usually used in the plural)argyll - a sock knitted or woven with an argyle design (usually used in the plural)
sock - hosiery consisting of a cloth covering for the foot; worn inside the shoe; reaches to between the ankle and the knee
References in periodicals archive ?
One would think that the same measure should be used in measuring wheat, barley and oats, but in Buteshire a boll of wheat equals 240 pounds, and a boll of barley equals 320 pounds, while a boll of oats in Argyleshire equals six bushels.
In her note to Mr Sotheran, UK visitor Margaret Fromow, of Kilcreggan, Argyleshire, says the little Teesside bell still hangs outside the chapel of the church centre in New Zealand and is rung every day to call people to daily worship.
He had left his home farm in Argyleshire, near the west coast of Scotland, to study marine engineering in Glasgow, then took work in a ship-building firm along the Clyde.