Aristotelianism


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Ar·is·to·te·li·an

also Ar·is·to·te·le·an  (ăr′ĭ-stə-tē′lē-ən, -tēl′yən, ə-rĭs′tə-)
adj.
Of or relating to Aristotle or to his philosophy.
n.
1. A follower of Aristotle or his teachings.
2. A person whose thinking and methods tend to be empirical, scientific, or commonsensical.

Ar′is·to·te′li·an·ism n.

Aristotelianism

the philosophy of Aristotle, especially an emphasis upon formal deductive logic, upon the concept that reality is a combination of form and matter, and upon investigation of the concrete and particular. — Aristotelian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotelianism - (philosophy) the philosophy of Aristotle that deals with logic and metaphysics and ethics and poetics and politics and natural scienceAristotelianism - (philosophy) the philosophy of Aristotle that deals with logic and metaphysics and ethics and poetics and politics and natural science; "Aristotelianism profoundly influenced Western thought"
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
Aristotelismus
arisztotelianizmus
arystotelizm

Aristotelianism

[ˌærɪstəˈtiːlɪənɪzəm] Naristotelismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
It will be argued that Aristotelian realism does have an answer to the problem, but it requires a "semi-Platonist" Aristotelianism which makes some concessions to Platonism.
This project will not only contribute to the research on vernacular Aristotelianism funded by an ERC Starting Grant 2013 (ARISTOTLE 335949) and led by Marco Sgarbi but also fill the gap in international studies with a complete analysis of the subject.
It's not a full history of the efforts to understand nature that were made in the centuries before Copernicus shattered Aristotelianism, but a succinct and authoritative summary of the key steps in the path to modern methods and knowledge.
While Sullivan suggests a certain variability as "each romance episode generates distinctive horizontal and vertical models to suit its own purposes" (11), Spenser, Sidney, and Shakespeare write under the "ascendancy" of Aristotelianism.
The book contains both a description of the task as well as exercises in observation and language designed to move a person to an awareness of the Aristotelianism unconsciously embedded in one's life.
He carefully traces the emergence of Aristotelianism in Italy, and he goes on to show how the Council of Trent stimulated a revival of interest in scholasticism that dovetailed with Italian publication of commentaries on Aristotle.
Similarly, Freeman believes that the primacy of "scholastic Aristotelianism was to retard intellectual progress until well into the seventeenth century" (p.
In his synthesis of Calvinism, Aristotelianism, and Germanic corporatism, he emphasized consent, agreement, and communication among all citizens, whether they were believers or not.
Hattab's thought-provoking account problematizes the rigidness of dichotomies such as revolutionaries versus traditionalists, major versus minor figures, and Aristotelianism versus the New Philosophy, to reinterpret one of the seminal chapters in the history of ideas.
But as Alasdair MacIntyre aptly puts it, a "systematic history of Aristotelianism would be an immense undertaking populated by a great variety of rival Aristotles," (10) and the Aristotle that populates the best of contemporary scholarship holds views strongly at variance with Feser's Scholasticized Aristotelianism.
One version of this criticism that has proven to have considerable staying power is the argument that Aristotelianism demands too much of the virtuous person in the way of knowledge to be credible.
Roughly, Husserl held to Platonism in one sense (universals are abstract entities that can exist unexemplified) and Aristotelianism in another (when exemplified, the universal forms a complex property-instance, it is nonspatially in that instance and, thus, the particular that has the instance).