Aristotle

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Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles

Aristotle

nAristoteles m

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
References in classic literature ?
We can appreciate Aristotle's critical analysis of constitutions, but find it hard to take seriously his advice to the legislator.
This is the principle expressed in Aristotle's account of political justice, the principle of "tools to those who can use them.
When we come to Aristotle's analysis of existing constitutions, we find that while he regards them as imperfect approximations to the ideal, he also thinks of them as the result of the struggle between classes.
Aristotle's failure does not lie in this, that he is both idealist and realist, but that he keeps these two tendencies too far apart.
brother what father of the church is it, who says that the errors of heretics have always had for their lurking place the thickets of Aristotle's metaphysics?
My friend, the fact was known before Aristotle's days - that is to say, nearly two thousand years ago.
The germs of two valuable principles of education may also be gathered from the 'words of priests and priestesses:' (1) that true knowledge is a knowledge of causes (compare Aristotle's theory of episteme); and (2) that the process of learning consists not in what is brought to the learner, but in what is drawn out of him.
Rasmussen and Den Uyl make it clear that they don't intend to defend Aristotle's conclusions about political morality.
Although Roark's interpretation is not as novel as he sometimes suggests--indeed it was the preferred reading of Aristotle's temporal theory among certain medieval philosophers--there is little doubt that Roark has infused the view with new life and added some philosophically insightful twists.
com/square), about the size of a postage stamp, is a valuable addition to Aristotle's suite of mobile campaign management tools, empowering canvassers and other field staff to quickly and easily accept credit and debit card payments when going door-to-door or at campaign events or rallies.
Studtmann details a variety of Aristotle's uses of 'form' while showing how problematic it is for such a key term to be linked with so many seemingly disparate concepts.
Paul Lettinck, Aristotle's Meteorology and its Reception in the Arab World with an Edition and Translation of Ibn Suwar's Treatise on Meteorological Phenomena and Ibn Bajja's Commentary on the Meteorology (Leiden/Boston/Koln: Brill, 1999), ix+505 pp, HB, ISBN 90 04 10933 1