Aristotle

(redirected from Aristotles)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Aristotles: Plato

Ar·is·tot·le

 (ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l) 384-322 bc.
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought. In his philosophical system, which led him to criticize what he saw as Plato's metaphysical excesses, theory follows empirical observation and logic, based on the syllogism, is the essential method of rational inquiry.

aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
1. a bottle
2. old-fashioned the buttocks or anus
[rhyming slang; in sense 2, shortened from bottle and glass arse]

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Biography) 384–322 bc, Greek philosopher; pupil of Plato, tutor of Alexander the Great, and founder of the Peripatetic school at Athens; author of works on logic, ethics, politics, poetics, rhetoric, biology, zoology, and metaphysics. His works influenced Muslim philosophy and science and medieval scholastic philosophy

Aristotle

(ˈærɪˌstɒtəl)
n
(Celestial Objects) a prominent crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 83 kilometres in diameter

Ar•is•tot•le

(ˈær əˌstɒt l)

n.
384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great.

Ar·is·tot·le

(ăr′ĭ-stŏt′l)
384-322 b.c. Greek philosopher and scientist who profoundly influenced Western thought. Aristotle wrote about virtually every area of knowledge, including most of the sciences. Throughout his life he made careful observations, collected specimens, and summarized all the existing knowledge of the natural world. He pioneered the study of zoology, developing a classification system for all animals and making extensive taxonomic studies. His systematic approach later evolved into the basic scientific method in the Western world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophersAristotle - one of the greatest of the ancient Athenian philosophers; pupil of Plato; teacher of Alexander the Great (384-322 BC)
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations
AristotelesAristotelés
Aristoteles
Aristoteles
Arystoteles

Aristotle

[ˈærɪstɒtl] NAristóteles

Aristotle

nAristoteles m

Aristotle

[ˈærɪˌstɒtl] nAristotele m
References in periodicals archive ?
Loys Le Roy, Aristotles politiques, or Discourses of gouernment, London, 1598 (Early English Books Online, Cambridge University Library), 53-54.
Aristotles Giagounidis, of the Marien Hospital in Dusseldorf, Germany, said, "Transfusion dependent MDS patients, with an isolated 5q deletion, have had few effective therapy options historically, but the European Commission decision now brings new hope for these people, with an effective and targeted treatment option.
The Platos, Aristotles, Socrates, specifically with regard to the way they mirrored society and spoke of the social political process, have become comedians.
See Phanomenologische Interpretationen zu Aristotles (Einfuhrung in die phenomenologische Forschung) in Gesamtausgabe (Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1975-), 61:3 / Phenomenological Interpretations of Aristotle: Initiation into Phenomenological Research, trans.
This again raises the spectre of diminishing returns: the true glory of scientific creation lies with the Aristotles and Newtons of our world, while we epigones face an ever more difficult task as we attempt to push science to truly new heights.
Elizabeth's] house: our pleasant studies in readyng together Aristotles Rethorike, Cicero, and Livie' (sig.
Longeway evaluates the development of medieval theories of demonstration before, during and after Ockham's contribution, making modern readers a part of the progress of the philosophy of science long before and long after Ockham managed to slip his own ideas alongside those of Aristotles.
He characteristically complains that "Yf the byshop of Romes lawes, decrees decretals, extravagantes, clementines and other suche dregges of the devyll, yea yf Heytesburyes sophismes, Porphyryes universals, Aristotles olde logyckes and Dunses dyvynyte, wyth such other lowly legerdemaynes, and frutes of the bottomlesse pytte, had leaped out of our libraries, and so becomen coverynges for bokes comminge from the foren nacyons, we might wele have ben therwith contented.
Thus, an extensive reading of Strauss and his disciples might lead us to think that Aristotles was a sexual egalitarian who would have been an abolitionist in antebellum America, that Thucydides was writing his Histories to vindicate democratic imperialism as an ideal, and that Plato was a metaphysical skeptic who only pretended to accept eternal forms.
But in natural sciences whose conclusions are true and necessary and have nothing to do with human will, one must take care not to place oneself in the defense of error; for here a thousand Demostheneses and a thousand Aristotles would be left in the lurch by every mediocre wit who happened to hit upon the truth for himself.
And here, therefore, it would [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] Leonardo's counterpart in the 20th century is undoubtedly Albert Schweitzer (18 is summed up in the term Reverence for Life, a universal code of ethics that [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] Norman Cousins, the late editor of the now sadly defunct Saturday Review, visit [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] The Aristotles, the da Vincis, the Goethes, the Jeffersons, the Schweitzers are, in [Alpha][Epsilon]i, possessions forever.
The Aristotles of strength coaches are Tennessee's John Stucky, Nebraska's Boyd Epley, the New York Giants' Al Miller and the New England Patriots' Johnny Parker.